Editorial comment on Karlsson et al. “Cognitive behavior therapy in women with fibromyalgia. A randomized clinical trial”

Editorial comment on Karlsson et al. “Cognitive behavior therapy in women with fibromyalgia. A... In this edition of Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Karlsson et al. test the effect of a manual based cognitive behavioral intervention for female patients with fibromyalgia [1]. The randomized, controlled study focuses on maladaptive cognitions and behavior thought to maintain and exacerbate pain conditions. The bio-psycho-social model of pain, a definition of stress presented by Lazarus and Folk-man [2], as well as the fear-avoidance model by Vlayen and Linton [3] provide the overarching theoretical framework. The authors use a dimension of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory as a primary outcome, hypothesizing that a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) developed for pain and stress would influence perceived life control. They also hypothesized secondary effects on interference from pain, emotional distress and social support, as well as stress, depression and pain severity. Their results showed a significant increase in life control, reduction in affective distress and depression, as well as a reduction of stress. The study tells a story about CBT changing the perception of pain in participants, giving a higher quality of life, even though they actually report more pain during the follow-up period.Their results on stress reduction through CBT are enticing considering the different lines of research indicating the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Editorial comment on Karlsson et al. “Cognitive behavior therapy in women with fibromyalgia. A randomized clinical trial”

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.08.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this edition of Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Karlsson et al. test the effect of a manual based cognitive behavioral intervention for female patients with fibromyalgia [1]. The randomized, controlled study focuses on maladaptive cognitions and behavior thought to maintain and exacerbate pain conditions. The bio-psycho-social model of pain, a definition of stress presented by Lazarus and Folk-man [2], as well as the fear-avoidance model by Vlayen and Linton [3] provide the overarching theoretical framework. The authors use a dimension of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory as a primary outcome, hypothesizing that a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) developed for pain and stress would influence perceived life control. They also hypothesized secondary effects on interference from pain, emotional distress and social support, as well as stress, depression and pain severity. Their results showed a significant increase in life control, reduction in affective distress and depression, as well as a reduction of stress. The study tells a story about CBT changing the perception of pain in participants, giving a higher quality of life, even though they actually report more pain during the follow-up period.Their results on stress reduction through CBT are enticing considering the different lines of research indicating the

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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