Dynamic and static mechanical pain sensitivity is associated in women with migraine

Dynamic and static mechanical pain sensitivity is associated in women with migraine AbstractAimsTo explore the association between static (hyperalgesia) and dynamic (allodynia) pressure algometry for assessing muscle pain hypersensitivity in women with migraine.MethodsOne hundred and twenty women with migraine (42% chronic, 58% episodic) participated. Dynamic muscle allodynia was assessed with a dynamic pressure algometry set (Aalborg University, Denmark©) consisting of 11 rollers with fixed pressure levels from 500 g to 5300 g. Each roller was moved at a speed of 0.5 cm/s over a 60 mm horizontal line covering the temporalis muscle. Dynamic pain threshold (DPT-pressure level of the first painful roller) was calculated on each side of the head. Migraine pain features were collected on a headache-diary. As golden standard, static pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed over the temporalis muscle, C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal and tibialis anterior to assess widespread pressure hyperalgesia.ResultsSide-to-side consistency between DPT (r = 0.769, P < 0.001) was found. DPT was moderately associated with widespread PPTs (0.364 > r > 0.769, all P < 0.001). No significant association with migraine pain features (frequency, intensity or duration of migraine attack) were observed (all, P > 0.129). Associations were similar in women with episodic or chronic migraine.ConclusionsDynamic pressure algometry was valid for assessing dynamic mechanical muscle allodynia in migraine. DPT was associated with widespread static muscle hyperalgesia independently of migraine frequency supporting that dynamic muscle allodynia in the trigeminal area is consistent with generalized pressure pain hyperalgesia. Assessing dynamic deep somatic tissue sensitivity may provide a new tool for assessing treatment effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Dynamic and static mechanical pain sensitivity is associated in women with migraine

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAimsTo explore the association between static (hyperalgesia) and dynamic (allodynia) pressure algometry for assessing muscle pain hypersensitivity in women with migraine.MethodsOne hundred and twenty women with migraine (42% chronic, 58% episodic) participated. Dynamic muscle allodynia was assessed with a dynamic pressure algometry set (Aalborg University, Denmark©) consisting of 11 rollers with fixed pressure levels from 500 g to 5300 g. Each roller was moved at a speed of 0.5 cm/s over a 60 mm horizontal line covering the temporalis muscle. Dynamic pain threshold (DPT-pressure level of the first painful roller) was calculated on each side of the head. Migraine pain features were collected on a headache-diary. As golden standard, static pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed over the temporalis muscle, C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal and tibialis anterior to assess widespread pressure hyperalgesia.ResultsSide-to-side consistency between DPT (r = 0.769, P < 0.001) was found. DPT was moderately associated with widespread PPTs (0.364 > r > 0.769, all P < 0.001). No significant association with migraine pain features (frequency, intensity or duration of migraine attack) were observed (all, P > 0.129). Associations were similar in women with episodic or chronic migraine.ConclusionsDynamic pressure algometry was valid for assessing dynamic mechanical muscle allodynia in migraine. DPT was associated with widespread static muscle hyperalgesia independently of migraine frequency supporting that dynamic muscle allodynia in the trigeminal area is consistent with generalized pressure pain hyperalgesia. Assessing dynamic deep somatic tissue sensitivity may provide a new tool for assessing treatment effects.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2017

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