Does initial dosing of levothyroxine in infants with congenital hypothyroidism lead to frequent dose adjustments secondary to iatrogenic hyperthyroidism on follow-up?

Does initial dosing of levothyroxine in infants with congenital hypothyroidism lead to frequent... AbstractBackground:Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common preventable cause of intellectual disability. The recommended starting dose of levothyroxine (LT4) is between 10 and 15 μg/kg, an extremely wide range. We hypothesized that a sizable proportion of newborns treated for CH at the higher end of the dosage range become biochemically hyperthyroid at a follow-up visit.Methods:This study is a retrospective chart review of infants with CH between 2002 and 2012.Results:Of the 104 patients included in this analysis, the average age at diagnosis was 11 days and the average starting dose of LT4 was 12±2.5 μg/kg. At follow-up, 36.5% required a dose reduction because of iatrogenic hyperthyroxinemia, 51% required no dose adjustment and 12.5% required a dose increase due to an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The starting doses of LT4 for those requiring a dose reduction, those not requiring an adjustment and those requiring an increase in the dose were 13.2±2.4, 11.5±2.1 and 10.3±2.6 μg/kg/day, respectively (p≤0.0001). Of the 34% of infants treated with an initial dose of >12.5 μg/day, 57.1% required a dose reduction at follow-up, compared to 26.1% of those whose initial starting dose was ≤12.5 μg/kg/day (p=0.007).Conclusions:Following the guidelines for initiating therapy for CH, 36.5% of the infants required a dose reduction for iatrogenic hyperthyroxinemia. These infants received a higher dose of LT4 than the infants who either required no adjustment or required an increase in the dose. A narrower range for initial dosing in CH may be appropriate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

Does initial dosing of levothyroxine in infants with congenital hypothyroidism lead to frequent dose adjustments secondary to iatrogenic hyperthyroidism on follow-up?

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2191-0251
eISSN
2191-0251
D.O.I.
10.1515/jpem-2017-0513
Publisher site
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Abstract

AbstractBackground:Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common preventable cause of intellectual disability. The recommended starting dose of levothyroxine (LT4) is between 10 and 15 μg/kg, an extremely wide range. We hypothesized that a sizable proportion of newborns treated for CH at the higher end of the dosage range become biochemically hyperthyroid at a follow-up visit.Methods:This study is a retrospective chart review of infants with CH between 2002 and 2012.Results:Of the 104 patients included in this analysis, the average age at diagnosis was 11 days and the average starting dose of LT4 was 12±2.5 μg/kg. At follow-up, 36.5% required a dose reduction because of iatrogenic hyperthyroxinemia, 51% required no dose adjustment and 12.5% required a dose increase due to an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The starting doses of LT4 for those requiring a dose reduction, those not requiring an adjustment and those requiring an increase in the dose were 13.2±2.4, 11.5±2.1 and 10.3±2.6 μg/kg/day, respectively (p≤0.0001). Of the 34% of infants treated with an initial dose of >12.5 μg/day, 57.1% required a dose reduction at follow-up, compared to 26.1% of those whose initial starting dose was ≤12.5 μg/kg/day (p=0.007).Conclusions:Following the guidelines for initiating therapy for CH, 36.5% of the infants required a dose reduction for iatrogenic hyperthyroxinemia. These infants received a higher dose of LT4 than the infants who either required no adjustment or required an increase in the dose. A narrower range for initial dosing in CH may be appropriate.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Jun 27, 2018

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