Diagnostic and prognostic value of presepsin vs. established biomarkers in critically ill patients with sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome

Diagnostic and prognostic value of presepsin vs. established biomarkers in critically ill... AbstractBackground:Inflammatory biomarkers may aid to distinguish between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) vs. sepsis. We tested the hypotheses that (1) presepsin, a novel biomarker, can distinguish between SIRS and sepsis, and (2) higher presepsin levels will be associated with increased severity of illness and (3) with 28-day mortality, outperforming traditional biomarkers.Methods:Procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), presepsin, and lactate were analyzed in 60 consecutive patients (sepsis and SIRS, n=30 per group) on day 1 (D1) to D3 (onset sepsis, or after cardiac surgery). The systemic organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was determined daily.Results:There was no difference in mortality in sepsis vs. SIRS (12/30 vs. 8/30). Patients with sepsis had higher SOFA score vs. patients with SIRS (11±4 vs. 8±5; p=0.023), higher presepsin (AUC=0.674; p<0.021), PCT (AUC=0.791; p<0.001), CRP (AUC=0.903; p<0.0001), but not lactate (AUC=0.506; p=0.941). Unlike other biomarkers, presepsin did not correlate with SOFA on D1. All biomarkers were associated with mortality on D1: presepsin (AUC=0.734; p=0.0006; best cutoff=1843 pg/mL), PCT (AUC=0.844; p<0.0001), CRP (AUC=0.701; p=0.0048), and lactate (AUC=0.778; p<0.0001). Multiple regression analyses showed independent associations of CRP with diagnosis of sepsis, and CRP and lactate with mortality. Increased neutrophils (p=0.002) and decreased lymphocytes (p=0.007) and monocytes (p=0.046) were also associated with mortality.Conclusions:Presepsin did not outperform traditional sepsis biomarkers in diagnosing sepsis from SIRS and in prognostication of mortality in critically ill patients. Presepsin may have a limited adjunct value for both diagnosis and an early risk stratification, performing independently of clinical illness severity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) de Gruyter

Diagnostic and prognostic value of presepsin vs. established biomarkers in critically ill patients with sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1437-4331
eISSN
1437-4331
D.O.I.
10.1515/cclm-2017-0839
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground:Inflammatory biomarkers may aid to distinguish between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) vs. sepsis. We tested the hypotheses that (1) presepsin, a novel biomarker, can distinguish between SIRS and sepsis, and (2) higher presepsin levels will be associated with increased severity of illness and (3) with 28-day mortality, outperforming traditional biomarkers.Methods:Procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), presepsin, and lactate were analyzed in 60 consecutive patients (sepsis and SIRS, n=30 per group) on day 1 (D1) to D3 (onset sepsis, or after cardiac surgery). The systemic organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was determined daily.Results:There was no difference in mortality in sepsis vs. SIRS (12/30 vs. 8/30). Patients with sepsis had higher SOFA score vs. patients with SIRS (11±4 vs. 8±5; p=0.023), higher presepsin (AUC=0.674; p<0.021), PCT (AUC=0.791; p<0.001), CRP (AUC=0.903; p<0.0001), but not lactate (AUC=0.506; p=0.941). Unlike other biomarkers, presepsin did not correlate with SOFA on D1. All biomarkers were associated with mortality on D1: presepsin (AUC=0.734; p=0.0006; best cutoff=1843 pg/mL), PCT (AUC=0.844; p<0.0001), CRP (AUC=0.701; p=0.0048), and lactate (AUC=0.778; p<0.0001). Multiple regression analyses showed independent associations of CRP with diagnosis of sepsis, and CRP and lactate with mortality. Increased neutrophils (p=0.002) and decreased lymphocytes (p=0.007) and monocytes (p=0.046) were also associated with mortality.Conclusions:Presepsin did not outperform traditional sepsis biomarkers in diagnosing sepsis from SIRS and in prognostication of mortality in critically ill patients. Presepsin may have a limited adjunct value for both diagnosis and an early risk stratification, performing independently of clinical illness severity.

Journal

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)de Gruyter

Published: Mar 28, 2018

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