Cortical reorganization of the healthy hand in upper-limb complex regional pain syndrome(CRPS): Is reorganizations of common beliefs about CRPS necessary?

Cortical reorganization of the healthy hand in upper-limb complex regional pain syndrome(CRPS):... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Di Pietro et al. [1] report some interesting findings concerning reorganization of the somatosensory cerebral cortex (S1) in subjects with chronic pain and having the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). The use of fMRI and PET to try to unravel central function or dysfunction, both as the cause and/or effect of chronic pain is a burgeoning field. We welcome more information that can help shed light on this area in patients using non-invasive investigation of brain function. CRPS continues to be poorly understood and with poor treatment outcomes despite the use of a wide spectrum of treatment modalities. Even though this is a small patient segment, it deserves more attention from researchers, both clinical and in the basic sciences.1Mini-review of diagnosis and treatment of CRPSLoss of function is common in CRPS. Abnormal sensory and motor findings are also common and form the basis for making the diagnosis of CRPS [2]. Despite much interest and ongoing research, even using animal models, CRPS is poorly understood. Various treatment strategies have been reported but a subset of patients fail to respond to a wide variety of treatments including invasive (spinal cord http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Cortical reorganization of the healthy hand in upper-limb complex regional pain syndrome(CRPS): Is reorganizations of common beliefs about CRPS necessary?

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.07.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Di Pietro et al. [1] report some interesting findings concerning reorganization of the somatosensory cerebral cortex (S1) in subjects with chronic pain and having the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). The use of fMRI and PET to try to unravel central function or dysfunction, both as the cause and/or effect of chronic pain is a burgeoning field. We welcome more information that can help shed light on this area in patients using non-invasive investigation of brain function. CRPS continues to be poorly understood and with poor treatment outcomes despite the use of a wide spectrum of treatment modalities. Even though this is a small patient segment, it deserves more attention from researchers, both clinical and in the basic sciences.1Mini-review of diagnosis and treatment of CRPSLoss of function is common in CRPS. Abnormal sensory and motor findings are also common and form the basis for making the diagnosis of CRPS [2]. Despite much interest and ongoing research, even using animal models, CRPS is poorly understood. Various treatment strategies have been reported but a subset of patients fail to respond to a wide variety of treatments including invasive (spinal cord

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2016

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