Correlation between quality of pain and depression: A post-operative assessment of pain after caesarian section among women in Ghana

Correlation between quality of pain and depression: A post-operative assessment of pain after... Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188Contents lists available at ScienceDirectScandinavian Journal of Painjournal homepage: www.ScandinavianJournalPain.comScientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting of theScandinavian Association for the Study of Pain (SASP)Correlation between quality of pain anddepression: A post-operative assessment of painafter caesarian section among women in GhanaV.A. Adzika a,∗ , F.N. Glozah b , D. Ayim-Aboagye a ,C.S.K. Ahorlu c , M. Ekuban daDepartment of Psychology and HumanDevelopment, Regent University College, Ghanab Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences,School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Ghanac Department of Epidemiology, Noguchi MemorialInst. for Medical Research, University of Ghana,Ghanad Department of Internal Medicine King DavidHospital, GhanaE-mail address: Vin.adzika@gmail.com (V.A. Adzika).Background and aims: Post-operative pain after caesareanoperation remains one of the major complains after delivery. Withthe rising rate of caesarean deliveries, the assessment and management of acute pain has become a major concern for medicalprofessionals in Ghana. The aim was to determine the associationbetween the neuroplasticity of pain and depression using a postoperative pain assessment among women after caesarean sectionin Ghana.Methods: A descriptive pilot studies consisting of 54 womenwho have undergone caesarean operations and reported of acutepain after three months were conducted in King David Hospital andNeptune Medical centre. A purposeful sampling was used to complete the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and the Wong-Baker FACES PainRating Scale to justify the inclusion criteria. While the Pain QualityAssessment Scale (PQAS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)were completed by participant.Results: On the characteristics of their pain respondents scoredabove 7, on average, for hot pains (7.04 ± 2.028, minimum of 5 andmaximum of 10), unpleasant pains (7.33 ± 1.907, minimum of 5 andmaximum of 10), intense and deep pain (7.35 ± 1.825, minimum of5 and maximum of 10) and intense but surface (7.38 ± 1.784, minimum of 5 and maximum of 10), each with a minimum of 5 and amaximum of 10. This implies that for each of those types of pain,respondents scored very high levels of intensity. Similarly, on intensity of pain sensation (6.43 ± 1.814, minimum of 5 and maximum of10), sharpness of pain (6.53 ± 1.772, minimum of 5 and maximumof 10), how dull their pains felt (6.38 ± 2.603, minimum of 0 and1877-8860/maximum of 10) sensitiveness of their skins (6.75 ± 1.9, minimumof 4 and maximum of 10) and how itchy (6.98 ± 2.137, minimum of4 and maximum of 10) their skins felt with their respective standarddeviations. On the depression scale, more than half of the respondents (51.9%) captured in this study had moderate depression.Conclusions: We ultimately sought to conduct a test of association between ten indicators of quality of pain and depression.There turned out to be significant association between intensity ofpain and depression ( 2 = 21.507; p < 0.001) simply implying thatwhere there is a rise in intensity of pain, there is likely going to bedepression. There was also a significant association between sharpsensation and depression ( 2 = 31.256).http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.006Dynamic and static mechanical pain sensitivityis associated in women with migraine˜ a,b , M. Ruíz c , J. Barón c , A.L.M. Palacios-Cena˜ a,b , L.Guerrero-Peral c , C. Fernández-de-las-PenasArendt-Nielsen a,∗aDepartment of Health Science and Technology,Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmarkb Departamento de Fisioterapia, TerapiaOcupacional, Rehabilitación y Medicina Física,Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spainc Headache Unit, Hospital Clínico Universitario deValladolid, SpainE-mail address: cesar.fernandez@urjc.es˜(C. Fernández-de-las-Penas).Aims: To explore the association between static (hyperalgesia)and dynamic (allodynia) pressure algometry for assessing musclepain hypersensitivity in women with migraine.Methods: One hundred and twenty women with migraine (42%chronic, 58% episodic) participated. Dynamic muscle allodynia wasassessed with a dynamic pressure algometry set (Aalborg University, Denmark© ) consisting of 11 rollers with fixed pressurelevels from 500 g to 5300 g. Each roller was moved at a speed of0.5 cm/s over a 60 mm horizontal line covering the temporalis muscle. Dynamic pain threshold (DPT-pressure level of the first painfulroller) was calculated on each side of the head. Migraine pain features were collected on a headache-diary. As golden standard, staticpressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed over the temporalis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Correlation between quality of pain and depression: A post-operative assessment of pain after caesarian section among women in Ghana

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De Gruyter
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© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
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1877-8860
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1877-8879
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10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.006
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Abstract

Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188Contents lists available at ScienceDirectScandinavian Journal of Painjournal homepage: www.ScandinavianJournalPain.comScientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting of theScandinavian Association for the Study of Pain (SASP)Correlation between quality of pain anddepression: A post-operative assessment of painafter caesarian section among women in GhanaV.A. Adzika a,∗ , F.N. Glozah b , D. Ayim-Aboagye a ,C.S.K. Ahorlu c , M. Ekuban daDepartment of Psychology and HumanDevelopment, Regent University College, Ghanab Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences,School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Ghanac Department of Epidemiology, Noguchi MemorialInst. for Medical Research, University of Ghana,Ghanad Department of Internal Medicine King DavidHospital, GhanaE-mail address: Vin.adzika@gmail.com (V.A. Adzika).Background and aims: Post-operative pain after caesareanoperation remains one of the major complains after delivery. Withthe rising rate of caesarean deliveries, the assessment and management of acute pain has become a major concern for medicalprofessionals in Ghana. The aim was to determine the associationbetween the neuroplasticity of pain and depression using a postoperative pain assessment among women after caesarean sectionin Ghana.Methods: A descriptive pilot studies consisting of 54 womenwho have undergone caesarean operations and reported of acutepain after three months were conducted in King David Hospital andNeptune Medical centre. A purposeful sampling was used to complete the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and the Wong-Baker FACES PainRating Scale to justify the inclusion criteria. While the Pain QualityAssessment Scale (PQAS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)were completed by participant.Results: On the characteristics of their pain respondents scoredabove 7, on average, for hot pains (7.04 ± 2.028, minimum of 5 andmaximum of 10), unpleasant pains (7.33 ± 1.907, minimum of 5 andmaximum of 10), intense and deep pain (7.35 ± 1.825, minimum of5 and maximum of 10) and intense but surface (7.38 ± 1.784, minimum of 5 and maximum of 10), each with a minimum of 5 and amaximum of 10. This implies that for each of those types of pain,respondents scored very high levels of intensity. Similarly, on intensity of pain sensation (6.43 ± 1.814, minimum of 5 and maximum of10), sharpness of pain (6.53 ± 1.772, minimum of 5 and maximumof 10), how dull their pains felt (6.38 ± 2.603, minimum of 0 and1877-8860/maximum of 10) sensitiveness of their skins (6.75 ± 1.9, minimumof 4 and maximum of 10) and how itchy (6.98 ± 2.137, minimum of4 and maximum of 10) their skins felt with their respective standarddeviations. On the depression scale, more than half of the respondents (51.9%) captured in this study had moderate depression.Conclusions: We ultimately sought to conduct a test of association between ten indicators of quality of pain and depression.There turned out to be significant association between intensity ofpain and depression ( 2 = 21.507; p < 0.001) simply implying thatwhere there is a rise in intensity of pain, there is likely going to bedepression. There was also a significant association between sharpsensation and depression ( 2 = 31.256).http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.006Dynamic and static mechanical pain sensitivityis associated in women with migraine˜ a,b , M. Ruíz c , J. Barón c , A.L.M. Palacios-Cena˜ a,b , L.Guerrero-Peral c , C. Fernández-de-las-PenasArendt-Nielsen a,∗aDepartment of Health Science and Technology,Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmarkb Departamento de Fisioterapia, TerapiaOcupacional, Rehabilitación y Medicina Física,Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spainc Headache Unit, Hospital Clínico Universitario deValladolid, SpainE-mail address: cesar.fernandez@urjc.es˜(C. Fernández-de-las-Penas).Aims: To explore the association between static (hyperalgesia)and dynamic (allodynia) pressure algometry for assessing musclepain hypersensitivity in women with migraine.Methods: One hundred and twenty women with migraine (42%chronic, 58% episodic) participated. Dynamic muscle allodynia wasassessed with a dynamic pressure algometry set (Aalborg University, Denmark© ) consisting of 11 rollers with fixed pressurelevels from 500 g to 5300 g. Each roller was moved at a speed of0.5 cm/s over a 60 mm horizontal line covering the temporalis muscle. Dynamic pain threshold (DPT-pressure level of the first painfulroller) was calculated on each side of the head. Migraine pain features were collected on a headache-diary. As golden standard, staticpressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed over the temporalis

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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