Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is not one single phenomenon – Large intra-individual differences depend on test stimulus (TS) and several other independent factors

Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is not one single phenomenon – Large intra-individual... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Nahman-Averbuch and co-workers [1] publish a study in which the aim was to characterize and explore the associations between conditioned pain modulation (CPM) responses assessed by different paradigms in the same cohort of subjects.1Endogenous modulation of nociceptive pathways is central in pain physiologyThrough a relatively well-characterized network, our body is able to regulate nociceptive processing to produce either facilitation or inhibition of the pain experience [2]. Put simply, facilitation of nociceptive activity will produce more intense pain, and inhibition will produce less pain. Increased pain inhibitory activity may be necessary during stress or the need to escape from threat. Increased pain facilitatory activity may be useful during recuperation from injury by producing hyperalgesia or allodynia around the injured tissue, reducing movement and promoting healing. Clearly, a physiological system with pain modulating capabilities is of outmost importance.2Dysfunctional endogenous pain regulation and chronic pain conditionsIt has been proposed that a dysfunctional endogenous pain modulatory system may contribute to chronic pain states [3]. In combination with other factors such as genetic predisposition and psychosocial factors such as context, mood, and cognitive set, dysfunctional pain modulation may lead to an increased vulnerability for long-lasting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is not one single phenomenon – Large intra-individual differences depend on test stimulus (TS) and several other independent factors

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2012 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2012.11.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Nahman-Averbuch and co-workers [1] publish a study in which the aim was to characterize and explore the associations between conditioned pain modulation (CPM) responses assessed by different paradigms in the same cohort of subjects.1Endogenous modulation of nociceptive pathways is central in pain physiologyThrough a relatively well-characterized network, our body is able to regulate nociceptive processing to produce either facilitation or inhibition of the pain experience [2]. Put simply, facilitation of nociceptive activity will produce more intense pain, and inhibition will produce less pain. Increased pain inhibitory activity may be necessary during stress or the need to escape from threat. Increased pain facilitatory activity may be useful during recuperation from injury by producing hyperalgesia or allodynia around the injured tissue, reducing movement and promoting healing. Clearly, a physiological system with pain modulating capabilities is of outmost importance.2Dysfunctional endogenous pain regulation and chronic pain conditionsIt has been proposed that a dysfunctional endogenous pain modulatory system may contribute to chronic pain states [3]. In combination with other factors such as genetic predisposition and psychosocial factors such as context, mood, and cognitive set, dysfunctional pain modulation may lead to an increased vulnerability for long-lasting

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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