CNS–mechanisms contribute to chronification of pain

CNS–mechanisms contribute to chronification of pain In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Per Brodal, professor of neurobiology at the Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway, publishes a topical review of how our central nervous system (CNS) handles sensory impulses from the peripheral nervous system [1]. Per Brodal is highly qualified to write such a review: he is the author of the outstanding textbook The Central Nervous System, now in its 5th Edition [2].1What is pain?The IASP definition of pain from 1994:“An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.”Amanda C. de C. Williams and Kenneth D. Craig recently proposed a new definition, mainly because they feel it is necessary to emphasize the psychosocial aspects of the experience of pain [3]:“Pain is a distressing experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage with sensory, emotional, cognitive, and social components.”Per Brodal emphasizes that.. .”pain is a sensation, an experience, and common with other sensations, e.g. itching, it has a bodily location”. Pain felt in an arthritic knee joint exists only when the person experiences it. The MRI image of the knee joint can give the observer an impression of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

CNS–mechanisms contribute to chronification of pain

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.03.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Per Brodal, professor of neurobiology at the Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway, publishes a topical review of how our central nervous system (CNS) handles sensory impulses from the peripheral nervous system [1]. Per Brodal is highly qualified to write such a review: he is the author of the outstanding textbook The Central Nervous System, now in its 5th Edition [2].1What is pain?The IASP definition of pain from 1994:“An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.”Amanda C. de C. Williams and Kenneth D. Craig recently proposed a new definition, mainly because they feel it is necessary to emphasize the psychosocial aspects of the experience of pain [3]:“Pain is a distressing experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage with sensory, emotional, cognitive, and social components.”Per Brodal emphasizes that.. .”pain is a sensation, an experience, and common with other sensations, e.g. itching, it has a bodily location”. Pain felt in an arthritic knee joint exists only when the person experiences it. The MRI image of the knee joint can give the observer an impression of a

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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