Chronic pain – The invisible disease? Not anymore!

Chronic pain – The invisible disease? Not anymore! In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, in the article “New objective findings after whiplash injuries: High blood flow in painful cervical soft tissue: An ultrasound pilot study” Hatem Kalawy and co-workers [1] describe an objective finding in localized sites where the patients experience pain. In patients suffering from chronic neck-pain following whiplash associated disorder (WAD), all regions identified by the patients as painful and tender corresponded to areas showing increased high blood flow, documented by gray scale ultrasound and colour Doppler examinations. The findings raise the possibility that chronic neck pain in WAD is related to the areas with high blood flow.1Objective findings in whiplash-associated painThis observation of increased blood-flow in painful neck-areas may become very important, both for the diagnostics of pain patients, for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain, and especially for these unfortunate WAD-patients who too often are met with disbelief by health care providers and insurance people.2We do not know why acute pain becomes chronic painThe exact pathogenesis of most kinds of chronic pain is largely unknown. For instance, what are the actual contributions and importance of peripheral and central mechanisms to the total experience of pain? How important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Chronic pain – The invisible disease? Not anymore!

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2013 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.07.024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, in the article “New objective findings after whiplash injuries: High blood flow in painful cervical soft tissue: An ultrasound pilot study” Hatem Kalawy and co-workers [1] describe an objective finding in localized sites where the patients experience pain. In patients suffering from chronic neck-pain following whiplash associated disorder (WAD), all regions identified by the patients as painful and tender corresponded to areas showing increased high blood flow, documented by gray scale ultrasound and colour Doppler examinations. The findings raise the possibility that chronic neck pain in WAD is related to the areas with high blood flow.1Objective findings in whiplash-associated painThis observation of increased blood-flow in painful neck-areas may become very important, both for the diagnostics of pain patients, for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain, and especially for these unfortunate WAD-patients who too often are met with disbelief by health care providers and insurance people.2We do not know why acute pain becomes chronic painThe exact pathogenesis of most kinds of chronic pain is largely unknown. For instance, what are the actual contributions and importance of peripheral and central mechanisms to the total experience of pain? How important

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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