Chronic pain and mortality

Chronic pain and mortality In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Nitter and Forseth report the mortality rate in women with self-reported chronic pain in a 17-year follow-up study [1]. This is by far the longest observation period reported on this subject, and the study supports previous findings of raised mortality in patients with chronic pain.In two studies by McBeth et al. they found that widespread body pain was related to an increased incidence of cancer and, furthermore, to a reduced probability of survival after cancer and cardiovascular disease [2,3]. In patients with muscular and widespread pain, other comorbidities are found as well. Having widespread pain or chronic regional pain was shown to be significant in 95 discordant twins [4], with pain affecting physical health, functioning, and sleep suggesting that acquired chronic pain was a risk factor. But chronic pain may also lie in the genes. Recent genetic pain studies seem to point out different types of response to pain and other psychophysical events based on e.g. the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphism [5]. Having a high pain-sensitive COMTgenotype was in some studies related to the development of fibromyalgia/widespread pain [6], but others, including the Norwegian HUNT studies, found neither this association nor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Chronic pain and mortality

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2013 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.01.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Nitter and Forseth report the mortality rate in women with self-reported chronic pain in a 17-year follow-up study [1]. This is by far the longest observation period reported on this subject, and the study supports previous findings of raised mortality in patients with chronic pain.In two studies by McBeth et al. they found that widespread body pain was related to an increased incidence of cancer and, furthermore, to a reduced probability of survival after cancer and cardiovascular disease [2,3]. In patients with muscular and widespread pain, other comorbidities are found as well. Having widespread pain or chronic regional pain was shown to be significant in 95 discordant twins [4], with pain affecting physical health, functioning, and sleep suggesting that acquired chronic pain was a risk factor. But chronic pain may also lie in the genes. Recent genetic pain studies seem to point out different types of response to pain and other psychophysical events based on e.g. the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphism [5]. Having a high pain-sensitive COMTgenotype was in some studies related to the development of fibromyalgia/widespread pain [6], but others, including the Norwegian HUNT studies, found neither this association nor

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2013

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