Chronic neuropathic pain following oxaliplatin and docetaxel: A 5-year follow-up questionnaire study

Chronic neuropathic pain following oxaliplatin and docetaxel: A 5-year follow-up questionnaire study 166Scientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188muscle, C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal and tibialis anterior toassess widespread pressure hyperalgesia.Results: Side-to-side consistency between DPT (r = 0.769,P < 0.001) was found. DPT was moderately associated withwidespread PPTs (0.364 > r > 0.769, all P < 0.001). No significantassociation with migraine pain features (frequency, intensity orduration of migraine attack) were observed (all, P > 0.129). Associations were similar in women with episodic or chronic migraine.Conclusions: Dynamic pressure algometry was valid forassessing dynamic mechanical muscle allodynia in migraine. DPTwas associated with widespread static muscle hyperalgesia independently of migraine frequency supporting that dynamic muscleallodynia in the trigeminal area is consistent with generalized pressure pain hyperalgesia. Assessing dynamic deep somatic tissuesensitivity may provide a new tool for assessing treatment effects.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.007The number of active trigger points isassociated with sensory and emotional aspectsof health-related quality of life in tension typeheadache˜ a,b , K. Wang a , M. Castaldo a , S.M. Palacios-CenaFuensalida-Novo b , C. Ordás-Bandera c , A.Guillem-Mesado d , L. Arendt-Nielsen a,∗ , C.˜ a,bFernández-de-las-PenasaDepartment of Health Science and Technology,Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmarkb Departamento de Fisioterapia, TerapiaOcupacional, Rehabilitación y Medicina Física,Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spainc Neurology Department. Hospital Rey Juan Carlos,Madrid, Spaind Neurology Department, Hospital GregorioMara˜nón, Madrid, SpainE-mail address: cesar.fernandez@urjc.es (C. Fernández-de-las˜Penas).Aims: Some evidence supports that referred pain elicited byactive trigger points (TrPs) reproduces some features of tensiontype headache (TTH). Our aim was to investigate the associationbetween the number of active TrPs and health-related quality oflife TTH.Methods: Patients with TTH diagnosed by experienced neurologists according to the last International Headache Classification(ICHD-III) were included. Exclusion criteria included other primary headaches, medication overuse headache, whiplash injuryor fibromyalgia. TrPs were bilaterally explored within the masseter, temporalis, trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis,and suboccipital. Health-related quality of life was assessed withthe SF-36 questionnaire including 8 domains: physical functioning,physical role, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health. Higher scores representbetter quality of life. Spearman correlation coefficients were usedto determine correlations between the active TrPs and SF-36.Results: Two hundred and two patients (mean age: 45 ± 12years) with a headache frequency of 17 ± 7 days/month participated. Each patient with TTH exhibited 4.7 ± 2.9 active TrPs. Thenumber of active TrPs showed moderate weak negative associations with bodily pain (rs : −0.216; P = 0.002), emotional role (rs :−0.185; P = 0.008) and vitality (rs : −0.161; P = 0.02), but not with theremaining domains: the higher the number of active TrPs, the worsethe emotional role and vitality and the higher the pain interferencewith daily life. These results were similar in both frequent episodicand chronic TTH.Conclusions: The number of active TrPs was associated withsensory and emotional aspects of quality of life in a cohort of subjects with TTH.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.008Chronic neuropathic pain following oxaliplatinand docetaxel: A 5-year follow-upquestionnaire studyK.J. Bennedsgaard a,∗ , L. Ventzel b , A.B. Jensen b ,A.R. Jensen b , H. Tankisi c , N.B. Finnerup aaDanish Pain Research Center, Department ofClinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,Denmarkb Department of Oncology, Aarhus UniversityHospital, Aarhus, Denmarkc Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, AarhusUniversity Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkE-mail address: krbenn@clin.au.dk (K.J. Bennedsgaard).Background: Adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel andoxaliplatin increases survival in patients with high-risk breastand colorectal cancer, respectively, but may induce acute andchronic neurotoxicity. This study is a 5-year follow-up of chronicchemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN).Methods: In 2011–2012, 74 patients with high-risk colorectalcancer and 100 patients with high-risk breast cancer answereda questionnaire before, during and one year after receiving adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and docetaxel, respectively.In 2016, a 5-year follow-up with the same questionnaire was performed in survivors.Results: Fifty-two (36.5% women) of 74 patients (91%) treatedwith oxaliplatin and 80 (100% women) of 100 patients (85%) treatedwith docetaxel answered the questionnaire. The most commonsymptoms of CIPN were tingling in the hands (44.2% in the oxaliplatin (CI 95% 30.5; 58.7) and 36.3% in the docetaxel group (CI 95%25.8; 47.8)) and feet (52.0% in the oxaliplatin (CI 95% 37.6; 66.0)and 37.5% (CI 95% 29.9; 49.0) in the docetaxel group) and numbness in the feet (34.6% in the oxaliplatin (CI 95% 22.0; 49.1) and17.5% (CI 95% 9.9; 27.6) in the docetaxel group). Pain was presentin the hands or feet in 28.9% of patients treated with oxaliplatin (CI95% 17.12; 43.0) and 31.3% of patients treated with docetaxel (CI95% 21.3; 42.6).Conclusions: The results showed no major change in symptomsof neuropathy or pain from 1 to 5 years after chemotherapy. Symptoms of neuropathy were more common in patients treated withoxaliplatin.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.009 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Chronic neuropathic pain following oxaliplatin and docetaxel: A 5-year follow-up questionnaire study

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de Gruyter
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© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
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1877-8860
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1877-8879
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10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.009
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Abstract

166Scientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188muscle, C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal and tibialis anterior toassess widespread pressure hyperalgesia.Results: Side-to-side consistency between DPT (r = 0.769,P < 0.001) was found. DPT was moderately associated withwidespread PPTs (0.364 > r > 0.769, all P < 0.001). No significantassociation with migraine pain features (frequency, intensity orduration of migraine attack) were observed (all, P > 0.129). Associations were similar in women with episodic or chronic migraine.Conclusions: Dynamic pressure algometry was valid forassessing dynamic mechanical muscle allodynia in migraine. DPTwas associated with widespread static muscle hyperalgesia independently of migraine frequency supporting that dynamic muscleallodynia in the trigeminal area is consistent with generalized pressure pain hyperalgesia. Assessing dynamic deep somatic tissuesensitivity may provide a new tool for assessing treatment effects.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.007The number of active trigger points isassociated with sensory and emotional aspectsof health-related quality of life in tension typeheadache˜ a,b , K. Wang a , M. Castaldo a , S.M. Palacios-CenaFuensalida-Novo b , C. Ordás-Bandera c , A.Guillem-Mesado d , L. Arendt-Nielsen a,∗ , C.˜ a,bFernández-de-las-PenasaDepartment of Health Science and Technology,Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmarkb Departamento de Fisioterapia, TerapiaOcupacional, Rehabilitación y Medicina Física,Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spainc Neurology Department. Hospital Rey Juan Carlos,Madrid, Spaind Neurology Department, Hospital GregorioMara˜nón, Madrid, SpainE-mail address: cesar.fernandez@urjc.es (C. Fernández-de-las˜Penas).Aims: Some evidence supports that referred pain elicited byactive trigger points (TrPs) reproduces some features of tensiontype headache (TTH). Our aim was to investigate the associationbetween the number of active TrPs and health-related quality oflife TTH.Methods: Patients with TTH diagnosed by experienced neurologists according to the last International Headache Classification(ICHD-III) were included. Exclusion criteria included other primary headaches, medication overuse headache, whiplash injuryor fibromyalgia. TrPs were bilaterally explored within the masseter, temporalis, trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis,and suboccipital. Health-related quality of life was assessed withthe SF-36 questionnaire including 8 domains: physical functioning,physical role, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health. Higher scores representbetter quality of life. Spearman correlation coefficients were usedto determine correlations between the active TrPs and SF-36.Results: Two hundred and two patients (mean age: 45 ± 12years) with a headache frequency of 17 ± 7 days/month participated. Each patient with TTH exhibited 4.7 ± 2.9 active TrPs. Thenumber of active TrPs showed moderate weak negative associations with bodily pain (rs : −0.216; P = 0.002), emotional role (rs :−0.185; P = 0.008) and vitality (rs : −0.161; P = 0.02), but not with theremaining domains: the higher the number of active TrPs, the worsethe emotional role and vitality and the higher the pain interferencewith daily life. These results were similar in both frequent episodicand chronic TTH.Conclusions: The number of active TrPs was associated withsensory and emotional aspects of quality of life in a cohort of subjects with TTH.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.008Chronic neuropathic pain following oxaliplatinand docetaxel: A 5-year follow-upquestionnaire studyK.J. Bennedsgaard a,∗ , L. Ventzel b , A.B. Jensen b ,A.R. Jensen b , H. Tankisi c , N.B. Finnerup aaDanish Pain Research Center, Department ofClinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,Denmarkb Department of Oncology, Aarhus UniversityHospital, Aarhus, Denmarkc Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, AarhusUniversity Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkE-mail address: krbenn@clin.au.dk (K.J. Bennedsgaard).Background: Adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel andoxaliplatin increases survival in patients with high-risk breastand colorectal cancer, respectively, but may induce acute andchronic neurotoxicity. This study is a 5-year follow-up of chronicchemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN).Methods: In 2011–2012, 74 patients with high-risk colorectalcancer and 100 patients with high-risk breast cancer answereda questionnaire before, during and one year after receiving adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and docetaxel, respectively.In 2016, a 5-year follow-up with the same questionnaire was performed in survivors.Results: Fifty-two (36.5% women) of 74 patients (91%) treatedwith oxaliplatin and 80 (100% women) of 100 patients (85%) treatedwith docetaxel answered the questionnaire. The most commonsymptoms of CIPN were tingling in the hands (44.2% in the oxaliplatin (CI 95% 30.5; 58.7) and 36.3% in the docetaxel group (CI 95%25.8; 47.8)) and feet (52.0% in the oxaliplatin (CI 95% 37.6; 66.0)and 37.5% (CI 95% 29.9; 49.0) in the docetaxel group) and numbness in the feet (34.6% in the oxaliplatin (CI 95% 22.0; 49.1) and17.5% (CI 95% 9.9; 27.6) in the docetaxel group). Pain was presentin the hands or feet in 28.9% of patients treated with oxaliplatin (CI95% 17.12; 43.0) and 31.3% of patients treated with docetaxel (CI95% 21.3; 42.6).Conclusions: The results showed no major change in symptomsof neuropathy or pain from 1 to 5 years after chemotherapy. Symptoms of neuropathy were more common in patients treated withoxaliplatin.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.009

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Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2017

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