Bringing the lab to the people: Experimental pain testing in the general population

Bringing the lab to the people: Experimental pain testing in the general population In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain (SJP), Waller and coauthors report normative data for pressure and cold pain thresholds in a cohort of young pain-free adults [1].1The use of experimental pain models in human pain researchExperimental pain tests provide a safe and reversible means of inducing pain in a dose dependent manner in the laboratory. These methods have been used in human pain research since the 1950s with experiments covering a wide range of topics such as psychophysics (pain measurement), pharmacological interventions, psychological mechanisms, placebo effects, and brain imaging. Most of these studies have been conducted as true experiments, with between-group or crossover designs, making causal conclusions valid.2Individual differences in experimental pain sensitivityIn the past ten years or so, the focus of experimental pain research has gradually shifted away from studying effects of experimental conditions, towards studying experimental pain sensitivity as a baseline characteristic of the individual. Three factors have contributed towards this development: First, the observation that there are huge individual differences in sensitivity to experimental pain stimuli [2]. In fact, these differences are so great that stimuli that lie well below pain threshold for some subjects may be well above pain tolerance for others. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Bringing the lab to the people: Experimental pain testing in the general population

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.09.010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain (SJP), Waller and coauthors report normative data for pressure and cold pain thresholds in a cohort of young pain-free adults [1].1The use of experimental pain models in human pain researchExperimental pain tests provide a safe and reversible means of inducing pain in a dose dependent manner in the laboratory. These methods have been used in human pain research since the 1950s with experiments covering a wide range of topics such as psychophysics (pain measurement), pharmacological interventions, psychological mechanisms, placebo effects, and brain imaging. Most of these studies have been conducted as true experiments, with between-group or crossover designs, making causal conclusions valid.2Individual differences in experimental pain sensitivityIn the past ten years or so, the focus of experimental pain research has gradually shifted away from studying effects of experimental conditions, towards studying experimental pain sensitivity as a baseline characteristic of the individual. Three factors have contributed towards this development: First, the observation that there are huge individual differences in sensitivity to experimental pain stimuli [2]. In fact, these differences are so great that stimuli that lie well below pain threshold for some subjects may be well above pain tolerance for others.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2016

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