Biomarkers of acute kidney injury: a step forward

Biomarkers of acute kidney injury: a step forward Acute kidney injury (AKI) reflects a broad spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from mild to severe injury that may result in dysfunction with recovery or nonrecovery, leading to some or permanent and complete loss of renal function that is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and costs. The incidence of AKI is increasing because of increased patient’s susceptibility (aging and comorbidities) and intensity of exposures (drugs, contrast media and major surgery). Despite advancements in diagnosis and care practice, AKI remains a disorder usually under/late recognized with high mortality [1]. One of the hidden reasons for persistent poor clinical outcomes may be the delay in timing for nephrology consultation as nephrologists are usually involved when severe AKI has already settled. According to the “iceberg of AKI” concept, many conditions are actually hidden under the cover of the tip of the iceberg although they should require the same or more attention by nephrologists but are usually unnoticed or self-managed by clinicians [2]. The Vicenza ADQI consensus conference group has introduced RIFLE criteria in 2004, allowing to make a standardized diagnosis of AKI and to define its clinical stage [3]. RIFLE classification allows characterizing AKI severity based on serum creatinine changes and urine http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) de Gruyter

Biomarkers of acute kidney injury: a step forward

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1437-4331
eISSN
1437-4331
D.O.I.
10.1515/cclm-2017-0300
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) reflects a broad spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from mild to severe injury that may result in dysfunction with recovery or nonrecovery, leading to some or permanent and complete loss of renal function that is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and costs. The incidence of AKI is increasing because of increased patient’s susceptibility (aging and comorbidities) and intensity of exposures (drugs, contrast media and major surgery). Despite advancements in diagnosis and care practice, AKI remains a disorder usually under/late recognized with high mortality [1]. One of the hidden reasons for persistent poor clinical outcomes may be the delay in timing for nephrology consultation as nephrologists are usually involved when severe AKI has already settled. According to the “iceberg of AKI” concept, many conditions are actually hidden under the cover of the tip of the iceberg although they should require the same or more attention by nephrologists but are usually unnoticed or self-managed by clinicians [2]. The Vicenza ADQI consensus conference group has introduced RIFLE criteria in 2004, allowing to make a standardized diagnosis of AKI and to define its clinical stage [3]. RIFLE classification allows characterizing AKI severity based on serum creatinine changes and urine

Journal

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)de Gruyter

Published: Jul 26, 2017

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