Association Between Bacterial Vaginosis and Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Uterine Cervix

Association Between Bacterial Vaginosis and Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Uterine Cervix AbstractIntroduction. Bacterial vaginosis is polymicrobial, primarily anaerobic infection, previously called non-specific vaginitis or vaginitis accompanied by Gardne-rella vaginallis. It is a result of an imbalance between different types of bacteria in the vagina. The aim of the study was to determine the association between bacterial vaginosis and squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix.Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a series of 338 sexually active women with cytologicallly diagnosed squamous intraepithelial lesion of the uterine cervix at the University Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Skopje in the period from October 2014 to October 2015. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 59 years (35±10.49). All women underwent cervical biopsy with endocervical curettage for histopathological analysis and cervical biopsy for detection and HPV typing. Criteria for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis was the presence of ≥20% clue cells of ePapanicolaou smear.Results. Bacterial vaginosis was detected in 19.5% (66/338) of the examined women. The most affected was the young population under the age of 30 years. The results showed an association between bacterial vaginosis and squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix (p=0.032). There was no association between bacterial vaginosis and the grade of lesion of the uterine cervix (p=0.118), nor with HPV infection (p=0.570). But, however an association was found between HPV infection and squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix (p=0.001).Conclusion. The most common risk factor for squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix are persistent high-risk HPV infections. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common co-infection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Macedonian Medical Review de Gruyter

Association Between Bacterial Vaginosis and Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Uterine Cervix

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/association-between-bacterial-vaginosis-and-squamous-intraepithelial-irT0mUEgtO
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Drage Dabeski et al., published by De Gruyter Open
eISSN
0025-1097
D.O.I.
10.1515/mmr-2016-0003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIntroduction. Bacterial vaginosis is polymicrobial, primarily anaerobic infection, previously called non-specific vaginitis or vaginitis accompanied by Gardne-rella vaginallis. It is a result of an imbalance between different types of bacteria in the vagina. The aim of the study was to determine the association between bacterial vaginosis and squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix.Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a series of 338 sexually active women with cytologicallly diagnosed squamous intraepithelial lesion of the uterine cervix at the University Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Skopje in the period from October 2014 to October 2015. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 59 years (35±10.49). All women underwent cervical biopsy with endocervical curettage for histopathological analysis and cervical biopsy for detection and HPV typing. Criteria for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis was the presence of ≥20% clue cells of ePapanicolaou smear.Results. Bacterial vaginosis was detected in 19.5% (66/338) of the examined women. The most affected was the young population under the age of 30 years. The results showed an association between bacterial vaginosis and squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix (p=0.032). There was no association between bacterial vaginosis and the grade of lesion of the uterine cervix (p=0.118), nor with HPV infection (p=0.570). But, however an association was found between HPV infection and squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix (p=0.001).Conclusion. The most common risk factor for squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix are persistent high-risk HPV infections. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common co-infection.

Journal

Macedonian Medical Reviewde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off