Aquaporin 4 expression on trigeminal satellite glial cells under normal and inflammatory conditions

Aquaporin 4 expression on trigeminal satellite glial cells under normal and inflammatory conditions AbstractAimsLimited information is currently available for the expression and role of Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) (AQ4) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). It has been demonstrated that AQP4 is expressed in sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry has revealed that satellite glial cells (SGCs) surrounding the cell bodies of the primary afferent sensory neurons in these sensory ganglia exclusively express AQP4 at a considerably lower level than what is seen in astrocytes. The pathophysiological relevance of AQP4 in peripheral nociception; however, remains unclear. Hence, this study aimed at investigating AQP4 expression in trigeminal neurons and SGCs under normal and inflammatory conditions relevant to craniofacial pain conditions.MethodsRat trigeminal ganglia (TG) were isolated from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to a model of trigeminal inflammation evoked by unilateral complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) injection in temporomandibular joint. Immunohistochemistry was performed on TG sections of CFA-treated animals. NeuN and GS markers were used for identification of neurons and SGCs, respectively. AQP4 expression was investigated in both ipsilateral and contralateral TG sections. The study protocol was approved by the local ethics committee.ResultsCo-localization of NeuN-AQP4 and GS-AQP4 were identified in both ipsi and contralateral trigeminal ganglia of the CFA-treated rats. However, we did not detect any difference between the ipsi- and contralateral side in terms of alteration in AQP4 receptor expression.ConclusionsAQP4 was expressed both on trigeminal neurons and SGCs and CFA did not cause a remarkable change in AQP4 expression, when ipsilateral and contralateral TG of the test animals was compared. Previously, it has been shown that in a neuropathic pain model no difference is detectable between wild type and AQP4-deficient mice, for mechanical and thermal perception; however, in formalin pain model AQP4-deficient mice have higher thermal pain thresholds. Further investigation is required to clarify role of AQP4 in pain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Aquaporin 4 expression on trigeminal satellite glial cells under normal and inflammatory conditions

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.055
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAimsLimited information is currently available for the expression and role of Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) (AQ4) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). It has been demonstrated that AQP4 is expressed in sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry has revealed that satellite glial cells (SGCs) surrounding the cell bodies of the primary afferent sensory neurons in these sensory ganglia exclusively express AQP4 at a considerably lower level than what is seen in astrocytes. The pathophysiological relevance of AQP4 in peripheral nociception; however, remains unclear. Hence, this study aimed at investigating AQP4 expression in trigeminal neurons and SGCs under normal and inflammatory conditions relevant to craniofacial pain conditions.MethodsRat trigeminal ganglia (TG) were isolated from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to a model of trigeminal inflammation evoked by unilateral complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) injection in temporomandibular joint. Immunohistochemistry was performed on TG sections of CFA-treated animals. NeuN and GS markers were used for identification of neurons and SGCs, respectively. AQP4 expression was investigated in both ipsilateral and contralateral TG sections. The study protocol was approved by the local ethics committee.ResultsCo-localization of NeuN-AQP4 and GS-AQP4 were identified in both ipsi and contralateral trigeminal ganglia of the CFA-treated rats. However, we did not detect any difference between the ipsi- and contralateral side in terms of alteration in AQP4 receptor expression.ConclusionsAQP4 was expressed both on trigeminal neurons and SGCs and CFA did not cause a remarkable change in AQP4 expression, when ipsilateral and contralateral TG of the test animals was compared. Previously, it has been shown that in a neuropathic pain model no difference is detectable between wild type and AQP4-deficient mice, for mechanical and thermal perception; however, in formalin pain model AQP4-deficient mice have higher thermal pain thresholds. Further investigation is required to clarify role of AQP4 in pain.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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