Anomalous temperature coefficient of resistance in graphene nanowalls/polymer films and applications in infrared photodetectors

Anomalous temperature coefficient of resistance in graphene nanowalls/polymer films and... AbstractGraphene nanowalls (GNWs) exhibit outstanding optoelectronic properties due to their peculiar structure, which makes them a great potential in infrared (IR) detection. Herein, a novel IR detector that is composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and designed based on GNWs is demonstrated. Such detector possesses an anomalous temperature coefficient of resistance of 180% K−1 and a relatively high change rate of current (up to 16%) under IR radiation from the human body. It primarily attributes to the ultra-high IR absorption of the GNWs and large coefficient of thermal expansion of PDMS. In addition, the GNW/PDMS device possesses excellent detection performance in the IR region with a responsivity of ~1.15 mA W−1. The calculated detectivity can reach 1.07×108 cm Hz1/2 W−1, which is one or two orders of magnitude larger than that of the traditional carbon-based IR detectors. The significant performance indicates that the GNW/PDMS-based devices reveal a novel design concept and promising applications for the future new-generation IR photodetectors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nanophotonics de Gruyter

Anomalous temperature coefficient of resistance in graphene nanowalls/polymer films and applications in infrared photodetectors

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/anomalous-temperature-coefficient-of-resistance-in-graphene-nanowalls-wlfJaiKNpX
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Jun Yang and Yongqi Fu et al., published by De Gruyter, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2192-8614
eISSN
2192-8614
D.O.I.
10.1515/nanoph-2017-0135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractGraphene nanowalls (GNWs) exhibit outstanding optoelectronic properties due to their peculiar structure, which makes them a great potential in infrared (IR) detection. Herein, a novel IR detector that is composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and designed based on GNWs is demonstrated. Such detector possesses an anomalous temperature coefficient of resistance of 180% K−1 and a relatively high change rate of current (up to 16%) under IR radiation from the human body. It primarily attributes to the ultra-high IR absorption of the GNWs and large coefficient of thermal expansion of PDMS. In addition, the GNW/PDMS device possesses excellent detection performance in the IR region with a responsivity of ~1.15 mA W−1. The calculated detectivity can reach 1.07×108 cm Hz1/2 W−1, which is one or two orders of magnitude larger than that of the traditional carbon-based IR detectors. The significant performance indicates that the GNW/PDMS-based devices reveal a novel design concept and promising applications for the future new-generation IR photodetectors.

Journal

Nanophotonicsde Gruyter

Published: May 24, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off