Analyzing transition from acute back pain to chronic pain with linear mixed models reveals a continuous chronification of acute back pain

Analyzing transition from acute back pain to chronic pain with linear mixed models reveals a... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Bendayan and co-workers from Spain, UK, and USA publish an interesting 24 months long follow-up study of 232 patients from Malaga with acute back pain at baseline [1].They followed changes in pain intensity, associated disability and depression, and they could document that pain intensity decreased rapidly during the first three months and typically changed only slowly during the next 21 months. Accompanying depressed mood assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) changed slowly during the entire 24 months period. Disability assessed with the Roland-Morris Questionnaire also decreased only slightly during the entire 24 months period of follow-up. Women and elderly patients reported higher pain intensities and pain-related disabilities during the first three months than men and younger patients.1Chronification of acute pain – a continuous ongoing process from the start of acute painThe authors indicate that the transition of acute back pain to a chronic pain condition, that the authors call chronification of acute pain, is a continuous process from the very beginning of an acute attack of back pain. They argue well that the very arbitrary definition of acute pain lasting more than three months – being a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Analyzing transition from acute back pain to chronic pain with linear mixed models reveals a continuous chronification of acute back pain

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.05.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Bendayan and co-workers from Spain, UK, and USA publish an interesting 24 months long follow-up study of 232 patients from Malaga with acute back pain at baseline [1].They followed changes in pain intensity, associated disability and depression, and they could document that pain intensity decreased rapidly during the first three months and typically changed only slowly during the next 21 months. Accompanying depressed mood assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) changed slowly during the entire 24 months period. Disability assessed with the Roland-Morris Questionnaire also decreased only slightly during the entire 24 months period of follow-up. Women and elderly patients reported higher pain intensities and pain-related disabilities during the first three months than men and younger patients.1Chronification of acute pain – a continuous ongoing process from the start of acute painThe authors indicate that the transition of acute back pain to a chronic pain condition, that the authors call chronification of acute pain, is a continuous process from the very beginning of an acute attack of back pain. They argue well that the very arbitrary definition of acute pain lasting more than three months – being a

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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