An overlooked cause of head- and neck-pain: Chronic canalithiasis, or Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo – BPPV

An overlooked cause of head- and neck-pain: Chronic canalithiasis, or Benign Paroxysmal... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Wenche Igle-bekk and co-workers report an observational study of patients referred from their GP for physiotherapy of musculoskeletal pain. Patients (N = 43) with head- and neck-pain of at least one year and with a positive Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) were selected for the study [1]. These patients were investigated for symptoms and objective signs indicating Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV): A history of dizziness provoked by sudden acceleration or deceleration movements and nystagmus (video-oculography) during the test positions for otoliths in one or more of the semicircular canals (SCCs) of the vestibule of the inner ear [1,2,3]. Most of the patients had severe neck pain, headache, and chronic fatigue. The patients often had visual disturbances, tinnitus, sleep disturbances, difficulties concentrating, and poor short-term memory. Physical exertion aggravated the symptoms. About half of the patients had pain in the temporo-mandibular region, generalized pain, nautical vertigo or combined rotatory and nautical vertigo, dizziness, and nausea. These 43 patients were treated with the specific otolith repositioning manoeuvres, depending on which SCC had symptomgiving otolith (s) [1].Clearly these patients were severely burdened and handicapped by their chronic complex pain condition that had lasted http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

An overlooked cause of head- and neck-pain: Chronic canalithiasis, or Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo – BPPV

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.02.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Wenche Igle-bekk and co-workers report an observational study of patients referred from their GP for physiotherapy of musculoskeletal pain. Patients (N = 43) with head- and neck-pain of at least one year and with a positive Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) were selected for the study [1]. These patients were investigated for symptoms and objective signs indicating Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV): A history of dizziness provoked by sudden acceleration or deceleration movements and nystagmus (video-oculography) during the test positions for otoliths in one or more of the semicircular canals (SCCs) of the vestibule of the inner ear [1,2,3]. Most of the patients had severe neck pain, headache, and chronic fatigue. The patients often had visual disturbances, tinnitus, sleep disturbances, difficulties concentrating, and poor short-term memory. Physical exertion aggravated the symptoms. About half of the patients had pain in the temporo-mandibular region, generalized pain, nautical vertigo or combined rotatory and nautical vertigo, dizziness, and nausea. These 43 patients were treated with the specific otolith repositioning manoeuvres, depending on which SCC had symptomgiving otolith (s) [1].Clearly these patients were severely burdened and handicapped by their chronic complex pain condition that had lasted

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2015

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