Amla (Emblica officinalis) improves hepatic and renal oxidative stress and the inflammatory response in hypothyroid female wistar rats fed with a high-fat diet

Amla (Emblica officinalis) improves hepatic and renal oxidative stress and the inflammatory... AbstractBackground:We investigated the protective effects of amla (Emblica officinalis) on the pathogenesis of oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory response in hypothyroid rats fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) as an experimental model of hypothyroidism (HT) with obesity.Methods:A total of 80 female wistar rats (5-months-old) were divided into eight different groups. Propylthiouracil (PTU) and HFD were used to induce the experimental HT and obesity, respectively. The euthyroid and hypothyroid rats were fed either normal chow or HFD with and without amla extract (AE, 100 mg/kg bw/day) for 6 weeks. The blood and tissues, liver and kidney OS and inflammatory parameters were studied using appropriate biochemical and molecular techniques.Results:PTU and HFD per se caused OS and inflammatory response as evidenced by increased plasma MDA, TNF-α, CRP and GPx in association with decreased levels of TAS and reduced glutathione (GSH). The proteomic analysis revealed that the expressions of pERK, pP38, TNF-α, IL6, COX2 and NOX-4 were up-regulated in the liver and kidney of these rats. In addition, all these metabolic derangements were further augmented when HT was followed by the addition of HFD. This suggested that there was a synergism between HT and the intake of HFD on the development of OS and inflammatory response.Conclusions:The treatment with amla fruit extract significantly restored the redox imbalance and inflammatory signaling and ameliorated OS and inflammatory response, suggesting the use of this natural compound as an alternative remedy or adjuvant for the management of metabolic complications concomitant with HT. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology de Gruyter

Amla (Emblica officinalis) improves hepatic and renal oxidative stress and the inflammatory response in hypothyroid female wistar rats fed with a high-fat diet

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2191-0286
eISSN
2191-0286
D.O.I.
10.1515/jbcpp-2017-0116
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground:We investigated the protective effects of amla (Emblica officinalis) on the pathogenesis of oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory response in hypothyroid rats fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) as an experimental model of hypothyroidism (HT) with obesity.Methods:A total of 80 female wistar rats (5-months-old) were divided into eight different groups. Propylthiouracil (PTU) and HFD were used to induce the experimental HT and obesity, respectively. The euthyroid and hypothyroid rats were fed either normal chow or HFD with and without amla extract (AE, 100 mg/kg bw/day) for 6 weeks. The blood and tissues, liver and kidney OS and inflammatory parameters were studied using appropriate biochemical and molecular techniques.Results:PTU and HFD per se caused OS and inflammatory response as evidenced by increased plasma MDA, TNF-α, CRP and GPx in association with decreased levels of TAS and reduced glutathione (GSH). The proteomic analysis revealed that the expressions of pERK, pP38, TNF-α, IL6, COX2 and NOX-4 were up-regulated in the liver and kidney of these rats. In addition, all these metabolic derangements were further augmented when HT was followed by the addition of HFD. This suggested that there was a synergism between HT and the intake of HFD on the development of OS and inflammatory response.Conclusions:The treatment with amla fruit extract significantly restored the redox imbalance and inflammatory signaling and ameliorated OS and inflammatory response, suggesting the use of this natural compound as an alternative remedy or adjuvant for the management of metabolic complications concomitant with HT.

Journal

Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacologyde Gruyter

Published: Mar 28, 2018

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