Advancing methods for characterizing structure and functions of small nerve fibres in neuropathic conditions

Advancing methods for characterizing structure and functions of small nerve fibres in neuropathic... In this issue of Scandinavian Journal of Pain Páll Karlsson and co-workers publish a study of the sensitivity and specificity of various methods for the diagnosis of small fibre impairment in patients with painful distal sensory polyneuropathies compared with healthy subjects [1]. In more detail, they have compared results of quantitative sensory testing (QST) (including temperature thresholds), response on pain and local vasodilatation by topical application of capsaicin, and various morphological variables of skin biopsies, such as intraepidermal nerve fibre density (IENFD) and new measures such as small fibre axonal swellings and the epidermal and dermal nerve length density (eNFLD and dNFDL).1Improving diagnostic accuracy of painful distal sensory polyneuropathiesThe authors address in this report a very important question: how to improve the diagnostic accuracy of painful distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP). Painful DSP is worldwide a large problem, affecting many millions of patients. Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of neuropathy [2] and with a considerable world-wide increase in diabetes, the occurrence of diabetic neuropathy is increasing [2,3]. In addition, other diseases like hypothyroidism [4], HIV [5], connective tissue diseases [6], and a large variety of inherited diseases may be complicated by or manifested by a painful neuropathy [7]. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Advancing methods for characterizing structure and functions of small nerve fibres in neuropathic conditions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/advancing-methods-for-characterizing-structure-and-functions-of-small-GX0yriSmA5
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.09.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of Scandinavian Journal of Pain Páll Karlsson and co-workers publish a study of the sensitivity and specificity of various methods for the diagnosis of small fibre impairment in patients with painful distal sensory polyneuropathies compared with healthy subjects [1]. In more detail, they have compared results of quantitative sensory testing (QST) (including temperature thresholds), response on pain and local vasodilatation by topical application of capsaicin, and various morphological variables of skin biopsies, such as intraepidermal nerve fibre density (IENFD) and new measures such as small fibre axonal swellings and the epidermal and dermal nerve length density (eNFLD and dNFDL).1Improving diagnostic accuracy of painful distal sensory polyneuropathiesThe authors address in this report a very important question: how to improve the diagnostic accuracy of painful distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP). Painful DSP is worldwide a large problem, affecting many millions of patients. Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of neuropathy [2] and with a considerable world-wide increase in diabetes, the occurrence of diabetic neuropathy is increasing [2,3]. In addition, other diseases like hypothyroidism [4], HIV [5], connective tissue diseases [6], and a large variety of inherited diseases may be complicated by or manifested by a painful neuropathy [7].

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off