Acute pain in the emergency department: Effect of an educational intervention

Acute pain in the emergency department: Effect of an educational intervention AbstractBackground and aimsPain management is often inadequate in emergency departments (ED) despite the availability of effective analgesics. Interventions to change professional behavior may therefore help to improve the management of pain within the ED. We hypothesized that a 2-h educational intervention combining e-learning and simulation would result in improved pain treatment of ED patients with pain.MethodsData were collected at the ED of Horsens Regional Hospital during a 3-week study period in March 2015. Pain intensity (NRS, 0–10) and analgesic administration were recorded 24 h a day for all patients who were admitted to the ED during the first and third study weeks. Fifty-three ED nurses and 14 ED residents participated in the educational intervention, which took place in the second study week.ResultsIn total, 247 of 796 patients had pain >3 on the NRS at the admission to the ED and were included in the data analysis. The theoretical knowledge of pain management among nurses and residents increased as assessed by a multiple choice test performed before and after the educational intervention (P = 0.001), but no change in clinical practice could be observed: The administration for analgesics [OR: 1.79 (0.97–3.33)] and for opioids [2.02 (0.79–5.18)] were similar before and after the educational intervention, as was the rate of clinically meaningful pain reduction (NRS >2) during the ED stay [OR: 0.81 (CI 0.45–1.44)].ConclusionsConduction of a 2-h educational intervention combining interactive case-based e-learning with simulation-based training in an ED setting was feasible with a high participation rate of nurses and residents. Their knowledge of pain management increased after completion of the program, but transfer of the new knowledge into clinical practice could not be found. Future research should explore the effects of repeated education of healthcare providers on pain management.ImplicationsIt is essential for nurses and residents in emergency departments to have the basic theoretical and practical skills to treat acute pain properly. A modern approach including e-learning and simulation lead to increased knowledge of acute pain management. Further studies are needed to show how this increased knowledge is transferred into clinical practice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Acute pain in the emergency department: Effect of an educational intervention

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.11.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground and aimsPain management is often inadequate in emergency departments (ED) despite the availability of effective analgesics. Interventions to change professional behavior may therefore help to improve the management of pain within the ED. We hypothesized that a 2-h educational intervention combining e-learning and simulation would result in improved pain treatment of ED patients with pain.MethodsData were collected at the ED of Horsens Regional Hospital during a 3-week study period in March 2015. Pain intensity (NRS, 0–10) and analgesic administration were recorded 24 h a day for all patients who were admitted to the ED during the first and third study weeks. Fifty-three ED nurses and 14 ED residents participated in the educational intervention, which took place in the second study week.ResultsIn total, 247 of 796 patients had pain >3 on the NRS at the admission to the ED and were included in the data analysis. The theoretical knowledge of pain management among nurses and residents increased as assessed by a multiple choice test performed before and after the educational intervention (P = 0.001), but no change in clinical practice could be observed: The administration for analgesics [OR: 1.79 (0.97–3.33)] and for opioids [2.02 (0.79–5.18)] were similar before and after the educational intervention, as was the rate of clinically meaningful pain reduction (NRS >2) during the ED stay [OR: 0.81 (CI 0.45–1.44)].ConclusionsConduction of a 2-h educational intervention combining interactive case-based e-learning with simulation-based training in an ED setting was feasible with a high participation rate of nurses and residents. Their knowledge of pain management increased after completion of the program, but transfer of the new knowledge into clinical practice could not be found. Future research should explore the effects of repeated education of healthcare providers on pain management.ImplicationsIt is essential for nurses and residents in emergency departments to have the basic theoretical and practical skills to treat acute pain properly. A modern approach including e-learning and simulation lead to increased knowledge of acute pain management. Further studies are needed to show how this increased knowledge is transferred into clinical practice.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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