Activation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) following disc herniation induces hyperexcitability in the pain pathways

Activation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) following disc herniation induces... AbstractAimsLow back pain and sciatica after disc herniation may be caused by mechanical compression of the nerve roots, but also by the release of pro-inflammatory agents including growth factors from the nucleus pulposus (NP).MethodsHere, in an animal model mimicking the clinical situation following disc herniation, CLIA protein analyses, extracellular single-cell recordings in the spinal dorsal horn and qPCR were performed to examine the nociceptive signaling due to disc herniation.Results The present data demonstrated that EREG may be released from NP - and that administration of EREG onto the spinal dorsal nerve roots increased spontaneous activity in nociceptive neurons. An up-regulation of EGFR and HER4 in the dorsal horn as well as an up-regulation of HER3 in the DRG were demonstrated after application of NP onto the dorsal nerve roots.ConclusionOur findings suggest that EREG and signaling through its receptors may be involved in pain hypersensitivity and other sensory abnormalities after disc herniation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Activation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) following disc herniation induces hyperexcitability in the pain pathways

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/activation-of-epidermal-growth-factor-receptors-egfrs-following-disc-50Vrrt5ZWu
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAimsLow back pain and sciatica after disc herniation may be caused by mechanical compression of the nerve roots, but also by the release of pro-inflammatory agents including growth factors from the nucleus pulposus (NP).MethodsHere, in an animal model mimicking the clinical situation following disc herniation, CLIA protein analyses, extracellular single-cell recordings in the spinal dorsal horn and qPCR were performed to examine the nociceptive signaling due to disc herniation.Results The present data demonstrated that EREG may be released from NP - and that administration of EREG onto the spinal dorsal nerve roots increased spontaneous activity in nociceptive neurons. An up-regulation of EGFR and HER4 in the dorsal horn as well as an up-regulation of HER3 in the DRG were demonstrated after application of NP onto the dorsal nerve roots.ConclusionOur findings suggest that EREG and signaling through its receptors may be involved in pain hypersensitivity and other sensory abnormalities after disc herniation.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off