Acid-induced experimental muscle pain and hyperalgesia with single and repeated infusion in human forearm

Acid-induced experimental muscle pain and hyperalgesia with single and repeated infusion in human... AbstractBackground and purposeAcid has long been thought to play an important role in the pain process. Animal study showed that repeated acid stimulation induced central sensitization. The purpose of the study is to investigate muscle pain and hyperalgesia evoked byintramuscular infusion of saline at different pH levels, and to compare the effect of a single versus repeated acid infusions.MethodsTwenty healthy subjects received infusions of buffered saline (pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.4) into the brachioradialis muscle in a randomized order. Twelve of the subjects received repeated infusions. The subjects rated the pain intensity on visual analogue scale (VAS). Thermal pain sensitivity, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were assessed in both arm before, during, immediately after, one hour after, and one day after the infusion. A McGill Pain Questionnaire and pain mapping were completed after each infusion.ResultsThe pH 5 solution caused significantly higher pain and larger areas than pH 6.0 or 7.4. The local PPTs were significantly decreased (hyperalgesia) during and immediately after infusion of all three solutions. No significant differences were detected between the first and second infusion.ConclusionsThe intensity of acid-induced muscle pain is pH-dependent. All three solutions induced pressure hyperalgesia at the infusion site. Repeated infusions did not induce increased pain or prolonged hyperalgesia as compared with a single injection. Human intramuscular acidic saline infusion could not produce chronic pain model.ImplicationsThe acid-induced pain model may reflect the early stage responses to tissue injury of clinical conditions. Repeated intramuscular acidic saline injection model of prolonged hyperalgesia in rodents could not be translated into a human for modelling chronic musculoskeletal pain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Acid-induced experimental muscle pain and hyperalgesia with single and repeated infusion in human forearm

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.07.012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground and purposeAcid has long been thought to play an important role in the pain process. Animal study showed that repeated acid stimulation induced central sensitization. The purpose of the study is to investigate muscle pain and hyperalgesia evoked byintramuscular infusion of saline at different pH levels, and to compare the effect of a single versus repeated acid infusions.MethodsTwenty healthy subjects received infusions of buffered saline (pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.4) into the brachioradialis muscle in a randomized order. Twelve of the subjects received repeated infusions. The subjects rated the pain intensity on visual analogue scale (VAS). Thermal pain sensitivity, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were assessed in both arm before, during, immediately after, one hour after, and one day after the infusion. A McGill Pain Questionnaire and pain mapping were completed after each infusion.ResultsThe pH 5 solution caused significantly higher pain and larger areas than pH 6.0 or 7.4. The local PPTs were significantly decreased (hyperalgesia) during and immediately after infusion of all three solutions. No significant differences were detected between the first and second infusion.ConclusionsThe intensity of acid-induced muscle pain is pH-dependent. All three solutions induced pressure hyperalgesia at the infusion site. Repeated infusions did not induce increased pain or prolonged hyperalgesia as compared with a single injection. Human intramuscular acidic saline infusion could not produce chronic pain model.ImplicationsThe acid-induced pain model may reflect the early stage responses to tissue injury of clinical conditions. Repeated intramuscular acidic saline injection model of prolonged hyperalgesia in rodents could not be translated into a human for modelling chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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