A novel miniature, wireless neurostimulator in the management of chronic craniofacial pain: Preliminary results from a prospective pilot study

A novel miniature, wireless neurostimulator in the management of chronic craniofacial pain:... AbstractObjectiveTo report a novel wireless neuromodulation system for treatment of refractory craniofacial pain.BackgroundPrevious studies utilizing peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of the occipital and trigeminal nerves reported positive outcomes for alleviating neuropathic pain localized to the craniofacial and occipital areas. However several technological limitations and cosmetic concerns inhibited a more widespread acceptance and use of neuromodulation. Also, a relatively high incidence of adverse events like electrode erosions, dislocation, wire fracture and/or infection at the surgical site mandates a change in our approach to neuromodulation technology and implant techniques in the craniofacial region.MethodsWe report a novel approach for the management of craniofacial pain with a wirelessly powered, minimally invasive PNS system. The system is percutaneously implanted and placed subcutaneously adjacent to affected facial nerves via visual guidance by the clinician. In this feasibility study, pilot evidence was gathered in a cohort of ten subjects suffering from a combination of chronic headaches, facial pain for at least 15 days per month and for at least 4 h/day.ResultsAt four weeks post-implant follow up, all patients reported sustained pain relief of the primary pain area. Electrode location and total number of electrodes used per subject varied across the cohort. The average pain reduction using the visual analog scale was >82%. The procedure had no adverse events or side effects.ConclusionsPercutaneous placement of a wireless neurostimulation device directly adjacent to affected craniofacial nerve (s) is a minimally invasive and reversible method of pain control in patients with craniofacial pain refractory to conventional medical managements. Preliminary results are encouraging and further larger scale studies are required for improved applications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

A novel miniature, wireless neurostimulator in the management of chronic craniofacial pain: Preliminary results from a prospective pilot study

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.09.010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractObjectiveTo report a novel wireless neuromodulation system for treatment of refractory craniofacial pain.BackgroundPrevious studies utilizing peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of the occipital and trigeminal nerves reported positive outcomes for alleviating neuropathic pain localized to the craniofacial and occipital areas. However several technological limitations and cosmetic concerns inhibited a more widespread acceptance and use of neuromodulation. Also, a relatively high incidence of adverse events like electrode erosions, dislocation, wire fracture and/or infection at the surgical site mandates a change in our approach to neuromodulation technology and implant techniques in the craniofacial region.MethodsWe report a novel approach for the management of craniofacial pain with a wirelessly powered, minimally invasive PNS system. The system is percutaneously implanted and placed subcutaneously adjacent to affected facial nerves via visual guidance by the clinician. In this feasibility study, pilot evidence was gathered in a cohort of ten subjects suffering from a combination of chronic headaches, facial pain for at least 15 days per month and for at least 4 h/day.ResultsAt four weeks post-implant follow up, all patients reported sustained pain relief of the primary pain area. Electrode location and total number of electrodes used per subject varied across the cohort. The average pain reduction using the visual analog scale was >82%. The procedure had no adverse events or side effects.ConclusionsPercutaneous placement of a wireless neurostimulation device directly adjacent to affected craniofacial nerve (s) is a minimally invasive and reversible method of pain control in patients with craniofacial pain refractory to conventional medical managements. Preliminary results are encouraging and further larger scale studies are required for improved applications.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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