A new treatable chronic pain diagnosis? Flank pain caused by entrapment of posterior cutaneous branch of intercostal nerves, lateral ACNES coined LACNES

A new treatable chronic pain diagnosis? Flank pain caused by entrapment of posterior cutaneous... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Robbert Maatman, and his co-workers in The Netherlands publish their retrospective observational study on 21 women and 9 men presenting with flank pain in whom they were able to make a diagnosis of lateral cutaneous entrapment syndrome (LACNES) [1]. These authors have long experience diagnosing and treating chronic abdominal pain due to entrapment in the abdominal wall of terminal endings of intercostal nerves (ACNES, anterior abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome) [2,3].These syndromes occur only occasionally, many physicians and even pain specialists are not familiar with these entrapment phenomena and the pain they generate. Therefore these patients may suffer prolonged periods from undiagnosed abdominal or flank pain, often with a diagnosis of “idiopathic” pain, “functional” pain, or even “psychogenic” pain. Such diagnoses are just expressions of failure to find any somatic cause of the pain. Patients may often have the impression that the health care providers consider them to have “imagined” pain. They have been exposed to several failed treatments. They risk being prescribed opioid analgesics in increasing doses. This adds to the patients’ problems, risking opioid use disorder.Specific ACNES characteristics include a small area (several square centimetres) of maximum pain, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

A new treatable chronic pain diagnosis? Flank pain caused by entrapment of posterior cutaneous branch of intercostal nerves, lateral ACNES coined LACNES

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.10.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Robbert Maatman, and his co-workers in The Netherlands publish their retrospective observational study on 21 women and 9 men presenting with flank pain in whom they were able to make a diagnosis of lateral cutaneous entrapment syndrome (LACNES) [1]. These authors have long experience diagnosing and treating chronic abdominal pain due to entrapment in the abdominal wall of terminal endings of intercostal nerves (ACNES, anterior abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome) [2,3].These syndromes occur only occasionally, many physicians and even pain specialists are not familiar with these entrapment phenomena and the pain they generate. Therefore these patients may suffer prolonged periods from undiagnosed abdominal or flank pain, often with a diagnosis of “idiopathic” pain, “functional” pain, or even “psychogenic” pain. Such diagnoses are just expressions of failure to find any somatic cause of the pain. Patients may often have the impression that the health care providers consider them to have “imagined” pain. They have been exposed to several failed treatments. They risk being prescribed opioid analgesics in increasing doses. This adds to the patients’ problems, risking opioid use disorder.Specific ACNES characteristics include a small area (several square centimetres) of maximum pain,

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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