A glimpse into a neglected population – Emerging adults

A glimpse into a neglected population – Emerging adults In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Rana Qadeer and co workers [1] have extrapolated information from a national data base in Canada [2] that is derived from structured interviews as opposed to more standard questionnaire data. This article addresses some interesting questions about pain and physical/mental health in a segment of the Canadian population. The major findings are that “emerging adults” have a prevalence of chronic pain, psychiatric diagnoses, and chronic disease states almost to the same degree as revealed by surveys from the whole adult population. The young are commonly thought to be relatively healthy as opposed to an older population but this does not seem the case in this cross-sectional survey. The interactions of chronic disease, mental health, including substance abuse and pain are reviewed with some surprising and some not so surprising conclusions. The statistics make interpretation in simple terms for a non-statistician a bit difficult but the data are important, not only for those interested in pain but also for all healthcare providers.1Emerging adults in transition from child to adult: 15 and 30 years of ageThe identification of this age group, initially ages 18-25 [3] but subsequently extended and in this article http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

A glimpse into a neglected population – Emerging adults

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/a-glimpse-into-a-neglected-population-emerging-adults-DlDz2DJBex
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.08.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Rana Qadeer and co workers [1] have extrapolated information from a national data base in Canada [2] that is derived from structured interviews as opposed to more standard questionnaire data. This article addresses some interesting questions about pain and physical/mental health in a segment of the Canadian population. The major findings are that “emerging adults” have a prevalence of chronic pain, psychiatric diagnoses, and chronic disease states almost to the same degree as revealed by surveys from the whole adult population. The young are commonly thought to be relatively healthy as opposed to an older population but this does not seem the case in this cross-sectional survey. The interactions of chronic disease, mental health, including substance abuse and pain are reviewed with some surprising and some not so surprising conclusions. The statistics make interpretation in simple terms for a non-statistician a bit difficult but the data are important, not only for those interested in pain but also for all healthcare providers.1Emerging adults in transition from child to adult: 15 and 30 years of ageThe identification of this age group, initially ages 18-25 [3] but subsequently extended and in this article

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off