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Why Dr. J. C. Bose did not reply to Mary Boole’s open letter of 1901

Why Dr. J. C. Bose did not reply to Mary Boole’s open letter of 1901 Mary Boole's open letter of 1901 123 of British Jews, and a professor of Hebrew at University College London, as an exemplary religious reformer. Her writings about David Marks appeared years after her husband's death in 1864, but she generally emphasized that the Hebraic Bible and customs were a source for George Boole's Laws of Thought. George Boole admired Newton and shared De Morgan's interest in the Jews, but whether he also shared his wife's identification of his 'Unity Law', (X + not-X=l), with the daily prayer 'Hear Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is one', is a question the answer to which was hidden with the destruction of his popular writings. George Boole's interest in number symbolism and the 'secret writings' of antiquity also continued some of Newton's related interests in deciphering the hieroglyphs in the Bible, and the alleged sources for the prophecies of Daniel and St. John in Solomon's Temple (Manuel 1963: 148-149, 162-163). For Boole, however, the aim was to decipher the laws of the human intellect, while he saw Newton's achievement as deciphering the laws of nature. Mary Boole's letter to Jagadish Chandra Bose, the Indian scientist who had created a stir http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0037-1998
eISSN
1613-3692
DOI
10.1515/semi.1995.105.1-2.123
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mary Boole's open letter of 1901 123 of British Jews, and a professor of Hebrew at University College London, as an exemplary religious reformer. Her writings about David Marks appeared years after her husband's death in 1864, but she generally emphasized that the Hebraic Bible and customs were a source for George Boole's Laws of Thought. George Boole admired Newton and shared De Morgan's interest in the Jews, but whether he also shared his wife's identification of his 'Unity Law', (X + not-X=l), with the daily prayer 'Hear Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is one', is a question the answer to which was hidden with the destruction of his popular writings. George Boole's interest in number symbolism and the 'secret writings' of antiquity also continued some of Newton's related interests in deciphering the hieroglyphs in the Bible, and the alleged sources for the prophecies of Daniel and St. John in Solomon's Temple (Manuel 1963: 148-149, 162-163). For Boole, however, the aim was to decipher the laws of the human intellect, while he saw Newton's achievement as deciphering the laws of nature. Mary Boole's letter to Jagadish Chandra Bose, the Indian scientist who had created a stir

Journal

Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotiquede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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