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When agreeing to disagree is not enough: Further arguments for the linguistic status of sign language agreement

When agreeing to disagree is not enough: Further arguments for the linguistic status of sign... When agreeing to disagree is not enough: Further arguments for the linguistic status of sign language agreement1 Josep Quer The discussion about sign language (SL) agreement, despite its centrality in the field and the attention received over the years, continues to dominate the Sign Linguistics debate regarding the analysis of the basic building blocks of languages in the gestural-visual modality. One important theme inherited from gesture studies that feeds this debate is the influence of gesture on linguistic structure. At the bottom we find two different rough conceptions of ‘language’ and, consequently, of the research domain: on the one hand, language in a narrow sense as a human faculty that can be described independently from other cognitive modules, despite the obvious interactions among them; on the other, language as a more global communicative capacity that engages different cognitive abilities and recruits non-domain specific elements. The former view is mainly pursued by formal linguists, while the latter represents the stand taken by functional and cognitive grammar oriented linguists. Such a divide in the approaches, represented here in an admittedly crude fashion, systematically leads to disagreement about what the crucial pieces of evidence are and how they should be analyzed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Theoretical Linguistics de Gruyter

When agreeing to disagree is not enough: Further arguments for the linguistic status of sign language agreement

Theoretical Linguistics , Volume 37 (3-4) – Oct 1, 2011

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2011 Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG, Berlin/Boston
Subject
Comments
ISSN
0301-4428
eISSN
1613-4060
DOI
10.1515/THLI.2011.014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

When agreeing to disagree is not enough: Further arguments for the linguistic status of sign language agreement1 Josep Quer The discussion about sign language (SL) agreement, despite its centrality in the field and the attention received over the years, continues to dominate the Sign Linguistics debate regarding the analysis of the basic building blocks of languages in the gestural-visual modality. One important theme inherited from gesture studies that feeds this debate is the influence of gesture on linguistic structure. At the bottom we find two different rough conceptions of ‘language’ and, consequently, of the research domain: on the one hand, language in a narrow sense as a human faculty that can be described independently from other cognitive modules, despite the obvious interactions among them; on the other, language as a more global communicative capacity that engages different cognitive abilities and recruits non-domain specific elements. The former view is mainly pursued by formal linguists, while the latter represents the stand taken by functional and cognitive grammar oriented linguists. Such a divide in the approaches, represented here in an admittedly crude fashion, systematically leads to disagreement about what the crucial pieces of evidence are and how they should be analyzed

Journal

Theoretical Linguisticsde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2011

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