Vitamin A levels and feeding practice in neonates with and without chronic lung disease

Vitamin A levels and feeding practice in neonates with and without chronic lung disease Introduction Vitamin A is essential for the differentiation and function of normal tissue and repair after injury. Recent studies have reported an association between vitamin A deficiency and chronic lung disease (CLD) in preterm infants [7, 11]. Two studies have demonstrated that infants with chronic lung disease require prolonged intravenous nutrition [7, 11]. It is therefore tempting to speculate that poor supplementation, while such infants remain nil by mouth, is the most likely explanation for the association of vitamin A deficiency and CLD. Although this hypothesis was supported by data from one study [11], it was contradicted by a second [7] which suggested infants with CLD actually receive more vitamin A than those without CLD [7]. HUSTEAD et al [7] suggested other mechanisms than inadequate administration of vitamin A should be considered to explain the association of CLD and low vitamin A levels; such as lack of mobilisation of retinol from hepatic stores, higher needs or more rapid utilisation of vitamin A in infants with CLD. If those suggestions are correct [7], infants at risk of developing CLD would require higher levels of vitamin A supplementation. Vitamin A supplementation, however, may be hazardous, as toxic levels result in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Perinatal Medicine de Gruyter

Vitamin A levels and feeding practice in neonates with and without chronic lung disease

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0300-5577
eISSN
1619-3997
DOI
10.1515/jpme.1993.21.3.205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Vitamin A is essential for the differentiation and function of normal tissue and repair after injury. Recent studies have reported an association between vitamin A deficiency and chronic lung disease (CLD) in preterm infants [7, 11]. Two studies have demonstrated that infants with chronic lung disease require prolonged intravenous nutrition [7, 11]. It is therefore tempting to speculate that poor supplementation, while such infants remain nil by mouth, is the most likely explanation for the association of vitamin A deficiency and CLD. Although this hypothesis was supported by data from one study [11], it was contradicted by a second [7] which suggested infants with CLD actually receive more vitamin A than those without CLD [7]. HUSTEAD et al [7] suggested other mechanisms than inadequate administration of vitamin A should be considered to explain the association of CLD and low vitamin A levels; such as lack of mobilisation of retinol from hepatic stores, higher needs or more rapid utilisation of vitamin A in infants with CLD. If those suggestions are correct [7], infants at risk of developing CLD would require higher levels of vitamin A supplementation. Vitamin A supplementation, however, may be hazardous, as toxic levels result in

Journal

Journal of Perinatal Medicinede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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