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Visualizing Archaeologists: A Reflexive History of Visualization Practice in Archaeology

Visualizing Archaeologists: A Reflexive History of Visualization Practice in Archaeology AbstractVisualization techniques may have changed over the years, but have they fundamentally changed archaeological visual literacy and the ways archaeologists create knowledge? Or do new digital tools merely disguise conventional practices? The answer may reside in a deeper understanding of the long tradition of visualization practice, from the Renaissance to the present, for which the foundation lies in the activities of antiquarians and artists, as well as artistic, technical, and scientific innovations. This paper presents an historical synopsis of two usually separated but complementary research areas, digital archaeology and archaeological visualization, and builds on previous research undertaken on these traditionally separated subjects. By taking a slightly Dutch perspective I will introduce a few visualizing protagonists who have left substantial traces in our collective visual memory, aiming to contribute to a more inclusive historical narrative on archaeological visualization. The overview ends with an integrated discussion on the shared creative visual practice and its epistemic role in archaeological knowledge production. A praxis-oriented and reflexive approach to the history of visualization provides a critical understanding of the current workings of 3D visualization as a creative practice, and how archaeology responds and acts upon innovations and the adoption of new visualization technology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Open Archaeology de Gruyter

Visualizing Archaeologists: A Reflexive History of Visualization Practice in Archaeology

Open Archaeology , Volume 7 (1): 25 – Jun 4, 2021

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2021 Loes Opgenhaffen, published by De Gruyter
ISSN
2300-6560
eISSN
2300-6560
DOI
10.1515/opar-2020-0138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractVisualization techniques may have changed over the years, but have they fundamentally changed archaeological visual literacy and the ways archaeologists create knowledge? Or do new digital tools merely disguise conventional practices? The answer may reside in a deeper understanding of the long tradition of visualization practice, from the Renaissance to the present, for which the foundation lies in the activities of antiquarians and artists, as well as artistic, technical, and scientific innovations. This paper presents an historical synopsis of two usually separated but complementary research areas, digital archaeology and archaeological visualization, and builds on previous research undertaken on these traditionally separated subjects. By taking a slightly Dutch perspective I will introduce a few visualizing protagonists who have left substantial traces in our collective visual memory, aiming to contribute to a more inclusive historical narrative on archaeological visualization. The overview ends with an integrated discussion on the shared creative visual practice and its epistemic role in archaeological knowledge production. A praxis-oriented and reflexive approach to the history of visualization provides a critical understanding of the current workings of 3D visualization as a creative practice, and how archaeology responds and acts upon innovations and the adoption of new visualization technology.

Journal

Open Archaeologyde Gruyter

Published: Jun 4, 2021

Keywords: visualization practice; epistemology; technological change; antiquarians; innovation

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