Verb seconding in Old English: verb movement to Infl

Verb seconding in Old English: verb movement to Infl Verb seconding in Old English: verb movement to Infl 1 SUSAN PINTZUK 1. Introduction Recent studies of Old English syntax have proposed that the position of the finite verb in main clauses is derived by verb seconding, while the position of the verb in subordinate clauses is derived by other processes. Van Kemenade (1987) and Kiparsky (1990), for example, claim that Old English is a verb second language like Modern German and Modern Dutch, with verb seconding moving finite verbs leftward to Comp in main clauses only. Under these analyses, the Old English main clause in (1) is a verb second clause, while the subordinate clauses in (2) through (4) are not,2 even though the finite verb is in second position in all four clauses: (2) is derived by verb raising, (3) by verb projection raising, and (4) by postposition of the NP, all well-attested processes in Germanic languages that move constituents rightward over the finite verb.3'4 1. This paper is based in part on chapter 3 of my doctoral dissertation. Thanks are due to Beatrice Santorini and to two anonymous reviewers for The Linguistic Review for detailed suggestions on earlier versions. All mistakes and shortcomings are of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Linguistic Review de Gruyter

Verb seconding in Old English: verb movement to Infl

The Linguistic Review, Volume 10 (1) – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0167-6318
eISSN
1613-3676
DOI
10.1515/tlir.1993.10.1.5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Verb seconding in Old English: verb movement to Infl 1 SUSAN PINTZUK 1. Introduction Recent studies of Old English syntax have proposed that the position of the finite verb in main clauses is derived by verb seconding, while the position of the verb in subordinate clauses is derived by other processes. Van Kemenade (1987) and Kiparsky (1990), for example, claim that Old English is a verb second language like Modern German and Modern Dutch, with verb seconding moving finite verbs leftward to Comp in main clauses only. Under these analyses, the Old English main clause in (1) is a verb second clause, while the subordinate clauses in (2) through (4) are not,2 even though the finite verb is in second position in all four clauses: (2) is derived by verb raising, (3) by verb projection raising, and (4) by postposition of the NP, all well-attested processes in Germanic languages that move constituents rightward over the finite verb.3'4 1. This paper is based in part on chapter 3 of my doctoral dissertation. Thanks are due to Beatrice Santorini and to two anonymous reviewers for The Linguistic Review for detailed suggestions on earlier versions. All mistakes and shortcomings are of

Journal

The Linguistic Reviewde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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