Utilization of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid and Components of Kraft Black Liquor as Energy Sources for Growth of Anaerobic Bacteria

Utilization of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid and Components of Kraft Black Liquor as Energy Sources... Introduction To remove chlorolignins from the effluents of wood pulp bleaching plants, biological processes such as aerated stabilization basins, activated sludge, anaerobic and also fungi treatments have been studied." In pulp bleaching effluents, biodegradable organic compounds may not be present in sufficient amounts to support growth of anaerobic microorganisms or fungi in order to provide for the removal of chlorolignins, the degradation of which may not yield useful energy for the bacteria. Thus such compounds as sugars, methanol and acetic acid have been added to serve as supplementary energy sources in studies of anaerobic (Ferguson et al. 1990) and fungi treatments (Joyce et al. 1988). A major stream arising in the kraft pulping and recovery process is "kraft black liquor", (KBL), which contains organic solutes consisting mainly of kraft lignin, (KL), polysaccharide degradation products, as well äs aliphatic carboxylic acids and smaller amounts of extractive components as discussed by Sjöström (1981). The composition of a typical KBL (20% total solids; about pH 11) from pine (Marton 1971), as percent of total solids, is as follows: alkali lignins (including soluble phenols), 41; extractives (fatty and rosin acids), 3; hydroxy acids and lactones, 28; acetic acid, 5; formic acid, 3; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

Utilization of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid and Components of Kraft Black Liquor as Energy Sources for Growth of Anaerobic Bacteria

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1993.47.2.141
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction To remove chlorolignins from the effluents of wood pulp bleaching plants, biological processes such as aerated stabilization basins, activated sludge, anaerobic and also fungi treatments have been studied." In pulp bleaching effluents, biodegradable organic compounds may not be present in sufficient amounts to support growth of anaerobic microorganisms or fungi in order to provide for the removal of chlorolignins, the degradation of which may not yield useful energy for the bacteria. Thus such compounds as sugars, methanol and acetic acid have been added to serve as supplementary energy sources in studies of anaerobic (Ferguson et al. 1990) and fungi treatments (Joyce et al. 1988). A major stream arising in the kraft pulping and recovery process is "kraft black liquor", (KBL), which contains organic solutes consisting mainly of kraft lignin, (KL), polysaccharide degradation products, as well äs aliphatic carboxylic acids and smaller amounts of extractive components as discussed by Sjöström (1981). The composition of a typical KBL (20% total solids; about pH 11) from pine (Marton 1971), as percent of total solids, is as follows: alkali lignins (including soluble phenols), 41; extractives (fatty and rosin acids), 3; hydroxy acids and lactones, 28; acetic acid, 5; formic acid, 3;

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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