Utility of estimated glucose disposal rate for predicting metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes

Utility of estimated glucose disposal rate for predicting metabolic syndrome in children and... AbstractObjectivesTo determine the clinical utility of the estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR) for predicting metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes (T1D).MethodsModified criteria of the International Diabetes Federation were used to determine MetS in children and adolescents between 10 and 18 years of age with T1D. The eGDR, a validated marker of insulin sensitivity, was calculated in two different ways using either the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) or waist circumference (WC). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to ascertain cut-off levels of the eGDR to predict MetS.ResultsA total of 200 patients (52% male) with T1D were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of MetS was 10.5% (n: 21). Lower eGDR levels, indicating greater insulin resistance, were found in T1D patients with MetS when compared to those without (6.41 ± 1.86 vs. 9.50 ± 1.34 mg/kg/min) (p < 0.001). An eGDRWHR cut-off of 8.44 mg/kg/min showed 85.7% sensitivity and 82.6% specificity, while an eGDRWC cut-off of 8.16 mg/kg/min showed 76.1% sensitivity and 92.1% specificity for MetS diagnosis. The diagnostic odds ratio was 28.6 (7.3–131.0) for the eGDRWHR cut-off and 37.7 (10.8–140.8) for the eGDRWC cut-off.ConclusionsThe eGDR is a mathematical formula that can be used in clinical practice to detect the existence of MetS in children and adolescents with T1D using only the WC, existence of hypertension, and hemoglobin A1c levels. An eGDR calculated using the WC could be a preferred choice due to its higher diagnostic performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

Utility of estimated glucose disposal rate for predicting metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2020 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2191-0251
eISSN
2191-0251
DOI
10.1515/jpem-2020-0012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractObjectivesTo determine the clinical utility of the estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR) for predicting metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes (T1D).MethodsModified criteria of the International Diabetes Federation were used to determine MetS in children and adolescents between 10 and 18 years of age with T1D. The eGDR, a validated marker of insulin sensitivity, was calculated in two different ways using either the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) or waist circumference (WC). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to ascertain cut-off levels of the eGDR to predict MetS.ResultsA total of 200 patients (52% male) with T1D were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of MetS was 10.5% (n: 21). Lower eGDR levels, indicating greater insulin resistance, were found in T1D patients with MetS when compared to those without (6.41 ± 1.86 vs. 9.50 ± 1.34 mg/kg/min) (p < 0.001). An eGDRWHR cut-off of 8.44 mg/kg/min showed 85.7% sensitivity and 82.6% specificity, while an eGDRWC cut-off of 8.16 mg/kg/min showed 76.1% sensitivity and 92.1% specificity for MetS diagnosis. The diagnostic odds ratio was 28.6 (7.3–131.0) for the eGDRWHR cut-off and 37.7 (10.8–140.8) for the eGDRWC cut-off.ConclusionsThe eGDR is a mathematical formula that can be used in clinical practice to detect the existence of MetS in children and adolescents with T1D using only the WC, existence of hypertension, and hemoglobin A1c levels. An eGDR calculated using the WC could be a preferred choice due to its higher diagnostic performance.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Jul 28, 2020

References

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