Treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia with repetitive oral activated charcoal as an adjunct to phototherapy

Treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia with repetitive oral activated charcoal as an adjunct to... Introduction Curriculum vitae YONA AMITAI, M.D., born in Israel (1947), is a graduate (cum laude) of the Sackler Medical School, Israel (1973). He was trained in pediatrics at the Sheba Medical Center, Israel, during 1973 -- 1978. He practices pediatrics at the Hadassah Hospital, MT. Scopus, Jerusalem, since 1978 and is a senior lecturer in pediatrics since 1987. He was a fellow in toxicology at the Children 's Hospital, Boston and the Harvard Medical School (1984 -- 1986) and is boards certified in pediatrics (Israel) and toxicology (USA). His main field of interest is management of poisoning in children. Enterohepatic circulation of bilirubin had been documented in neonates and is believed to contribute to the severity of hyperbilirubinemia [14]. This concept gave rise to attempts to decrease serum bilirubin levels in neonates by binding bilirubin in the gastrointestinal tract and interrupting its entero-hepatic circulation. Multiple doses of agar were shown to decrease serum bilirubin levels in term newborns [12, 14]. However, the efficacy of agar in treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia has not been confirmed in other studies [2, 4, 10, 11,13, 15, 20]. Multiple oral doses of activated charcoal (OAC) reduced serum bilirubin levels in normobilirubinemic newborns when the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Perinatal Medicine de Gruyter

Treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia with repetitive oral activated charcoal as an adjunct to phototherapy

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0300-5577
eISSN
1619-3997
DOI
10.1515/jpme.1993.21.3.189
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Curriculum vitae YONA AMITAI, M.D., born in Israel (1947), is a graduate (cum laude) of the Sackler Medical School, Israel (1973). He was trained in pediatrics at the Sheba Medical Center, Israel, during 1973 -- 1978. He practices pediatrics at the Hadassah Hospital, MT. Scopus, Jerusalem, since 1978 and is a senior lecturer in pediatrics since 1987. He was a fellow in toxicology at the Children 's Hospital, Boston and the Harvard Medical School (1984 -- 1986) and is boards certified in pediatrics (Israel) and toxicology (USA). His main field of interest is management of poisoning in children. Enterohepatic circulation of bilirubin had been documented in neonates and is believed to contribute to the severity of hyperbilirubinemia [14]. This concept gave rise to attempts to decrease serum bilirubin levels in neonates by binding bilirubin in the gastrointestinal tract and interrupting its entero-hepatic circulation. Multiple doses of agar were shown to decrease serum bilirubin levels in term newborns [12, 14]. However, the efficacy of agar in treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia has not been confirmed in other studies [2, 4, 10, 11,13, 15, 20]. Multiple oral doses of activated charcoal (OAC) reduced serum bilirubin levels in normobilirubinemic newborns when the

Journal

Journal of Perinatal Medicinede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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