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To postpone or not to postpone? Examining access policy on early foreign language learning from second language acquisition and language planning and policy perspectives

To postpone or not to postpone? Examining access policy on early foreign language learning from... AbstractThis paper examines the suggestion to postpone instruction on early foreign language learning, from both second language acquisition (SLA) and language planning and policy (LPP) perspectives. Contrary to the widely held belief that SLA research on age effects can inform policymakers as to when to start instruction, this paper demonstrates that such research may not offer much to language policymaking. The paper argues that the use of a more pragmatic approach in the transdisciplinarity of SLA and LPP emphasizing research into the benefits of instruction for children should be the underpinning SLA-based rationale for early foreign language learning policies. The paper contends that collaborative work between policymakers and researchers working in LPP and/or SLA domains in an SLA-LPP consortium could help address the problems occurring in the micro-context of policy interpretation and enactment with a primary focus on input enhancement rather than postponement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Linguistics Review de Gruyter

To postpone or not to postpone? Examining access policy on early foreign language learning from second language acquisition and language planning and policy perspectives

Applied Linguistics Review , Volume 8 (4): 21 – Nov 27, 2017

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1868-6311
eISSN
1868-6311
DOI
10.1515/applirev-2016-1044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper examines the suggestion to postpone instruction on early foreign language learning, from both second language acquisition (SLA) and language planning and policy (LPP) perspectives. Contrary to the widely held belief that SLA research on age effects can inform policymakers as to when to start instruction, this paper demonstrates that such research may not offer much to language policymaking. The paper argues that the use of a more pragmatic approach in the transdisciplinarity of SLA and LPP emphasizing research into the benefits of instruction for children should be the underpinning SLA-based rationale for early foreign language learning policies. The paper contends that collaborative work between policymakers and researchers working in LPP and/or SLA domains in an SLA-LPP consortium could help address the problems occurring in the micro-context of policy interpretation and enactment with a primary focus on input enhancement rather than postponement.

Journal

Applied Linguistics Reviewde Gruyter

Published: Nov 27, 2017

References