The semiotics of retail space: An application of the repertory grid methodology

The semiotics of retail space: An application of the repertory grid methodology CLIFF SCOTT The physical appearance of the retail outlet has consistently proven to be a determinant of retail patronage (Bearden 1977; Hansen and Deutscher 1977; Arnold et al. 1983). Yet the existent literature is virtually silent concerning consumer perceptions of retail environments (Scott 1985). At least in part, this void in the literature may be the result of marketing's lack of an established methodology for addressing human perceptions of physical environments. Accordingly, I will attempt to address two topics. First, I present a method for eliciting consumer perceptions of retail environments. Second, I will present preliminary results concerning consumer perceptions of department store entrances. Before these two may be presented, a certain amount of background is in order. This background concerns the Repertory Grid Test, which is at the heart of the methodology employed. Repertory grid test The Repertory Grid Test is based upon George Kelly's Personal Construct Theory. Kelly (1955) developed both his theory and the attendant methodology simultaneously, yielding a pair that fit one another hand-in-glove. While a full description of Kelly's thesis is beyond the scope of this paper, a brief introduction to some of his ideas may aid the appreciation of his technique. Kelly's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0037-1998
eISSN
1613-3692
DOI
10.1515/semi.1993.94.3-4.295
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CLIFF SCOTT The physical appearance of the retail outlet has consistently proven to be a determinant of retail patronage (Bearden 1977; Hansen and Deutscher 1977; Arnold et al. 1983). Yet the existent literature is virtually silent concerning consumer perceptions of retail environments (Scott 1985). At least in part, this void in the literature may be the result of marketing's lack of an established methodology for addressing human perceptions of physical environments. Accordingly, I will attempt to address two topics. First, I present a method for eliciting consumer perceptions of retail environments. Second, I will present preliminary results concerning consumer perceptions of department store entrances. Before these two may be presented, a certain amount of background is in order. This background concerns the Repertory Grid Test, which is at the heart of the methodology employed. Repertory grid test The Repertory Grid Test is based upon George Kelly's Personal Construct Theory. Kelly (1955) developed both his theory and the attendant methodology simultaneously, yielding a pair that fit one another hand-in-glove. While a full description of Kelly's thesis is beyond the scope of this paper, a brief introduction to some of his ideas may aid the appreciation of his technique. Kelly's

Journal

Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotiquede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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