The Rusyn language question revisited

The Rusyn language question revisited For nearly three centuries the East Slavic population living in the Carpathian Mountains, known äs Rusyns, has been faced with trying to resolve the so-called language question. In other words, which language should be used for literary purposes -- the local Rusyn dialect, the Church Slavonic liturgical language, or the literary language ofa related Slavic people such äs Russian or Ukrainian? The debate over this issue has since the second half of the nineteenth Century been closely linked to the question of national identity, that is, were the indigenous East Slavs in the Carpathians Russians, Ukrainians, or a distinct nationality known äs Rusyn or Carpatho-Rusyn? After World War //, the Soviet-influenced Communist regimes in all countries where Rusyns lived (with the exception of Yugoslavia) "resolved" the language question by declaring that only Ukrainian was acceptable. Since the political changes that started in 1989, a Rusyn national revival is underway and concrete efforts are being made to create a distinct Rusyn literary language. In 1929, a Rusyn satirist named Marko Barabolja wrote "a one-act dramatical work" that poked fun at the idea of an autonomous territory called Subcarpathian Rus'. This political entity was supposed to exist in the far http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of the Sociology of Language de Gruyter

The Rusyn language question revisited

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0165-2516
eISSN
1613-3668
D.O.I.
10.1515/ijsl.1996.120.63
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For nearly three centuries the East Slavic population living in the Carpathian Mountains, known äs Rusyns, has been faced with trying to resolve the so-called language question. In other words, which language should be used for literary purposes -- the local Rusyn dialect, the Church Slavonic liturgical language, or the literary language ofa related Slavic people such äs Russian or Ukrainian? The debate over this issue has since the second half of the nineteenth Century been closely linked to the question of national identity, that is, were the indigenous East Slavs in the Carpathians Russians, Ukrainians, or a distinct nationality known äs Rusyn or Carpatho-Rusyn? After World War //, the Soviet-influenced Communist regimes in all countries where Rusyns lived (with the exception of Yugoslavia) "resolved" the language question by declaring that only Ukrainian was acceptable. Since the political changes that started in 1989, a Rusyn national revival is underway and concrete efforts are being made to create a distinct Rusyn literary language. In 1929, a Rusyn satirist named Marko Barabolja wrote "a one-act dramatical work" that poked fun at the idea of an autonomous territory called Subcarpathian Rus'. This political entity was supposed to exist in the far

Journal

International Journal of the Sociology of Languagede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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