The Mechanism of Leaching of Copper-Chrome-Arsenic Preservatives from Treated Timber in Saline Waters

The Mechanism of Leaching of Copper-Chrome-Arsenic Preservatives from Treated Timber in Saline... Introduction It is essential that a wood preservative should give lasting prötection against decay and when the preserved timber is exposed to aquatic environments the preservative must be fixed adequately to resist leaching. Laboratory leaching studies, using distilled water, and employing comparatively short periods of time (Becker and Buchrnann 1966; Fahlstrom et al. 1967; Henry and Jeroski 1967; Laxamana 1968; Stalker 1972) have indicated that currently used preservatives give lasting prötection. However, Dunbar, (1962) has shown that CCA-treated timbers in brackish wateroperated cooling towers fail earlier than those in fresh water-operated towers and he suggested that the difference might be due to the activities of marine organisms. Later work (Irvine 1970, 1974; Jones and Irvine 1971; Irvine and Jones 1974) has however, shown that the tolerances of marine ifungi to CCA preservatives and their components are similar to those reported by Price and Watson (1962) for terrestrial fungi. Inapreviousstudy(Irvine 1970; Irvine et al. 1972) losses of preservatives from CCA-treated Scots pine in cooling towers varied significantly with the type of water used. It was suggested that the ionic composition of the water could be critical but other factors, such äs pH, temperature, nutrient Status and water throughput might http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

The Mechanism of Leaching of Copper-Chrome-Arsenic Preservatives from Treated Timber in Saline Waters

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1976.30.2.44
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction It is essential that a wood preservative should give lasting prötection against decay and when the preserved timber is exposed to aquatic environments the preservative must be fixed adequately to resist leaching. Laboratory leaching studies, using distilled water, and employing comparatively short periods of time (Becker and Buchrnann 1966; Fahlstrom et al. 1967; Henry and Jeroski 1967; Laxamana 1968; Stalker 1972) have indicated that currently used preservatives give lasting prötection. However, Dunbar, (1962) has shown that CCA-treated timbers in brackish wateroperated cooling towers fail earlier than those in fresh water-operated towers and he suggested that the difference might be due to the activities of marine organisms. Later work (Irvine 1970, 1974; Jones and Irvine 1971; Irvine and Jones 1974) has however, shown that the tolerances of marine ifungi to CCA preservatives and their components are similar to those reported by Price and Watson (1962) for terrestrial fungi. Inapreviousstudy(Irvine 1970; Irvine et al. 1972) losses of preservatives from CCA-treated Scots pine in cooling towers varied significantly with the type of water used. It was suggested that the ionic composition of the water could be critical but other factors, such äs pH, temperature, nutrient Status and water throughput might

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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