The Effect of Lignin Content on the Cure Properties of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin as Determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

The Effect of Lignin Content on the Cure Properties of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin as Determined by... Introduction The relatively high increase of petrochemicals cost renders PF resin very expensive and it has become increasingly necessary to find out how to reduce the amount of the resin used in wood composite manufacture. The use of fillers or extenders with PF resin as an alternative bonding system has been explored in plywood manufacture (Sellers Jr. 1985) and, very recently, in flakeboard manufacture (Waage et al. 1991). Lignin is a renewable by-product of pulp industry and has a polyphenolic structure which is similar to that of PF resins. This structural similarity makes lignin a good candidate for a partial replacement of PFin the amount of resin used in fiberboard manufacture. Also, due to this similarity, the possibility of incorporating it into the PFwith and without chemical modification may be considered. Much work has been done in this area and the use of non-modified as well as modified lignins has been reported. Studies on the curing of PF thermosets have been developed in many laboratories and reported in the literature in the last years, Muller et al. (1986), Kelley et al. (1986), Chow and Steiner (1974), Sebenik etal. (1974), Chow etal. (1975), Ebewele etal. (1986), White and Rust http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

The Effect of Lignin Content on the Cure Properties of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin as Determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1993.47.3.247
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction The relatively high increase of petrochemicals cost renders PF resin very expensive and it has become increasingly necessary to find out how to reduce the amount of the resin used in wood composite manufacture. The use of fillers or extenders with PF resin as an alternative bonding system has been explored in plywood manufacture (Sellers Jr. 1985) and, very recently, in flakeboard manufacture (Waage et al. 1991). Lignin is a renewable by-product of pulp industry and has a polyphenolic structure which is similar to that of PF resins. This structural similarity makes lignin a good candidate for a partial replacement of PFin the amount of resin used in fiberboard manufacture. Also, due to this similarity, the possibility of incorporating it into the PFwith and without chemical modification may be considered. Much work has been done in this area and the use of non-modified as well as modified lignins has been reported. Studies on the curing of PF thermosets have been developed in many laboratories and reported in the literature in the last years, Muller et al. (1986), Kelley et al. (1986), Chow and Steiner (1974), Sebenik etal. (1974), Chow etal. (1975), Ebewele etal. (1986), White and Rust

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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