Soy as an Endocrine Disruptor: Cause for Caution?

Soy as an Endocrine Disruptor: Cause for Caution? ABSTRACT Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) alter the function of the endocrine system and consequently cause adverse health effects. Phytoestrogens, natural plant compounds abundantly found in soy and soy products, behave as weak estrogen mimics or as antiestrogens. They are considered to be EDCs, and have some beneficial effects on health, including reducing the risk of breast cancer and improving metabolic parameters. However, the supporting evidence that consumption of phytoestrogens is beneficial is indirect and inconsistent. Lifetime exposure to estrogenic substances, especially during critical periods of development, has been associated with formation of malignancies and several anomalies of the reproductive systems. Phytoestrogen consumption in infants, through soy-based formulas, is of particular concern. Prospective epidemiological studies for the evaluation of the effect of phytoestrogens alone, and in combination with other estrogenic chemicals, are lacking, yet possible adverse effects should not be taken lightly. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

Soy as an Endocrine Disruptor: Cause for Caution?

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the
ISSN
0334-018X
eISSN
2191-0251
DOI
10.1515/jpem.2010.138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) alter the function of the endocrine system and consequently cause adverse health effects. Phytoestrogens, natural plant compounds abundantly found in soy and soy products, behave as weak estrogen mimics or as antiestrogens. They are considered to be EDCs, and have some beneficial effects on health, including reducing the risk of breast cancer and improving metabolic parameters. However, the supporting evidence that consumption of phytoestrogens is beneficial is indirect and inconsistent. Lifetime exposure to estrogenic substances, especially during critical periods of development, has been associated with formation of malignancies and several anomalies of the reproductive systems. Phytoestrogen consumption in infants, through soy-based formulas, is of particular concern. Prospective epidemiological studies for the evaluation of the effect of phytoestrogens alone, and in combination with other estrogenic chemicals, are lacking, yet possible adverse effects should not be taken lightly.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Sep 1, 2010

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