Short Note

Short Note Introduction The high mass material produced during pulp bleaching with chlorine-containing bleaching agents is a complex mixture which is difficult to characterize. Analytical and spectroscopic studies have shown the material has a low aromatic content and contains numerous polar functional groups such as carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups (Lindström and Österberg 1984; Österberg and Lindström 1985). Recent studies also suggest the molecular weight average may be considerably lower than previously thought because association effects occur during some of the analytical techniques used in molecular weight determination (Jokela and Salkinoja-Salonen 1992). A variety of lignin-type materials have been reported to exhibit molecular association in various solvents so this phenomenon is not new (Glasser and Sarkanen 1969). In addition, the high mass material has been shown to be capable of binding low mass fragments which are difficult to remove (O'Connor and Voss 1992). Although further studies will provide more information on the nature of the high mass material, it is apparent that other complementary approaches would be valuable in determining the structure, behaviour and envkonmental fate of this material. One approach to the study of this material is to use model compounds which have similar structural features. Recently it was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1993.47.6.497
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction The high mass material produced during pulp bleaching with chlorine-containing bleaching agents is a complex mixture which is difficult to characterize. Analytical and spectroscopic studies have shown the material has a low aromatic content and contains numerous polar functional groups such as carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups (Lindström and Österberg 1984; Österberg and Lindström 1985). Recent studies also suggest the molecular weight average may be considerably lower than previously thought because association effects occur during some of the analytical techniques used in molecular weight determination (Jokela and Salkinoja-Salonen 1992). A variety of lignin-type materials have been reported to exhibit molecular association in various solvents so this phenomenon is not new (Glasser and Sarkanen 1969). In addition, the high mass material has been shown to be capable of binding low mass fragments which are difficult to remove (O'Connor and Voss 1992). Although further studies will provide more information on the nature of the high mass material, it is apparent that other complementary approaches would be valuable in determining the structure, behaviour and envkonmental fate of this material. One approach to the study of this material is to use model compounds which have similar structural features. Recently it was

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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