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Seleucid Coinage in 175–166 BCE and the Historicity of Daniel 11:21–24

Seleucid Coinage in 175–166 BCE and the Historicity of Daniel 11:21–24 Historians and Bible scholars often state that Antiochus IV, a famous figure in Hellenistic history, became the king of the Seleucid kingdom immediately after the assassination of his brother Seleucus IV in September 175 BCE. They base this idea on a reconstruction of Seleucid coinage and on three texts: an Athenian inscription, a Babylonian King List and a passage in the historian Appian. Thus a Biblical passage, Dan. 11:21­24 is considered inaccurate in portraying Antiochus IV's accession as a gradual one that required extended political strategy. A new study of the coins of Antiochus, son of Seleucus IV, and Antiochus IV and of all these texts, however, will suggest that Antiochus, son of Seleucus IV, was king by himself for at least a couple of years if not from 175 until 170 when he was executed, and that Dan. 11:21­24, while clearly polemical, and numismatics, while complicated, should be reconsidered as evidence in the reconstruction of an important sequence in the history of this period. Keywords: Numismatics, Bible, Book of Daniel, Seleucid kingdom, Hellenistic history DOI 10.1515/jah-2014-0009 Dan. 11 describes historical events with an emphasis on the Seleucid kingdom from the third century BCE to the 160s BCE. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ancient History de Gruyter

Seleucid Coinage in 175–166 BCE and the Historicity of Daniel 11:21–24

Journal of Ancient History , Volume 2 (1) – May 31, 2014

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by the
ISSN
2324-8106
eISSN
2324-8114
DOI
10.1515/jah-2014-0009
Publisher site
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Abstract

Historians and Bible scholars often state that Antiochus IV, a famous figure in Hellenistic history, became the king of the Seleucid kingdom immediately after the assassination of his brother Seleucus IV in September 175 BCE. They base this idea on a reconstruction of Seleucid coinage and on three texts: an Athenian inscription, a Babylonian King List and a passage in the historian Appian. Thus a Biblical passage, Dan. 11:21­24 is considered inaccurate in portraying Antiochus IV's accession as a gradual one that required extended political strategy. A new study of the coins of Antiochus, son of Seleucus IV, and Antiochus IV and of all these texts, however, will suggest that Antiochus, son of Seleucus IV, was king by himself for at least a couple of years if not from 175 until 170 when he was executed, and that Dan. 11:21­24, while clearly polemical, and numismatics, while complicated, should be reconsidered as evidence in the reconstruction of an important sequence in the history of this period. Keywords: Numismatics, Bible, Book of Daniel, Seleucid kingdom, Hellenistic history DOI 10.1515/jah-2014-0009 Dan. 11 describes historical events with an emphasis on the Seleucid kingdom from the third century BCE to the 160s BCE.

Journal

Journal of Ancient Historyde Gruyter

Published: May 31, 2014

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