Roots of nuclearism: Censorship and reportage of atomic damage in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Roots of nuclearism: Censorship and reportage of atomic damage in Hiroshima and Nagasaki Information on atomic damage in Hiroshima and Nagasaki äs reported in the Japanese national daily, the Asahi Shimbun, during the months of August and September 1945 was (1) censored by the Japanese authorities (7-14 August 1945), (2) virtually free from censorship (15 August-18 September 1945), and (3) censored by the Occupation authorities (19 September 1945-31 October 1949). The censorship and reportage of atomic damage under these different conditions show how, during the period of Japanese censorship,censors minimized the bombs'damage, stressed thepossibility of taking counter\ · measures against future attacks, and focused on the contradiction between the espoused values of the Allies, justice and humanity, and the inhumanity of the atomic attacks. During the time reporters were free from censorship they continued to stress the inhumanity of the attacks, criticized the Japanese authorities, and highlighted the perspectives of the bombs'victims. The Occupation censors reduced the quantity and perverted the quality of Information on the atomic damage by (1) restricting the publication of material critical of the United States, (2) denying after-effects from nuclear exposure, and (3) blurrmg the victims 'perspectives on the atomic bombings. Introduction In the summer of 1945 a number of the leading scientists on the Manhattan http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Multilingua - Journal of Cross-Cultural and Interlanguage Communication de Gruyter

Roots of nuclearism: Censorship and reportage of atomic damage in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0167-8507
eISSN
1613-3684
DOI
10.1515/mult.1988.7.1-2.133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Information on atomic damage in Hiroshima and Nagasaki äs reported in the Japanese national daily, the Asahi Shimbun, during the months of August and September 1945 was (1) censored by the Japanese authorities (7-14 August 1945), (2) virtually free from censorship (15 August-18 September 1945), and (3) censored by the Occupation authorities (19 September 1945-31 October 1949). The censorship and reportage of atomic damage under these different conditions show how, during the period of Japanese censorship,censors minimized the bombs'damage, stressed thepossibility of taking counter\ · measures against future attacks, and focused on the contradiction between the espoused values of the Allies, justice and humanity, and the inhumanity of the atomic attacks. During the time reporters were free from censorship they continued to stress the inhumanity of the attacks, criticized the Japanese authorities, and highlighted the perspectives of the bombs'victims. The Occupation censors reduced the quantity and perverted the quality of Information on the atomic damage by (1) restricting the publication of material critical of the United States, (2) denying after-effects from nuclear exposure, and (3) blurrmg the victims 'perspectives on the atomic bombings. Introduction In the summer of 1945 a number of the leading scientists on the Manhattan

Journal

Multilingua - Journal of Cross-Cultural and Interlanguage Communicationde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1988

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