Relationship of Longitudinal Permeability to Treatability of Wood

Relationship of Longitudinal Permeability to Treatability of Wood Introduction During the last decade numerous studies have been made to evaluate the various factors affecting the treatability of wood by preservatives. It has been established that sapwood treats better than heartwood and that fluids move much faster in the longitudinal than in the transverse direction. Associated with these phenomena is the permeability of wood. The literature (Tesoro et al. 1966, Arganbright and Wilcox 1969, Erickson and Estep 1962, Siau 1970, Choong et al. 1972) revealed contradictory results on this property with treatability, although these studies predominantly indicate that highly permeable wood treats better than those woods of low permeability/ This paper reports on the relationship between various permeability and treatability values among different groups of wood species and wood types. Experimental Materials and Preparation Twelve species were selected for study. These included nine hardwoods and three softwoods. Of the hardwoods, four were ring porous: black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), American elm (Ulmus americana L.), white oak (Quercus spp.), and hackberry (Celtis occidentalis L.); three were diffuse porous: sycampre (Platanus occidentalis L.), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and soft maple (Acer spp.); and two were semiring porous: black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) and cotton12* Florentino O. Tesoro and Elvin http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Wood de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0018-3830
eISSN
1437-434X
DOI
10.1515/hfsg.1976.30.3.91
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction During the last decade numerous studies have been made to evaluate the various factors affecting the treatability of wood by preservatives. It has been established that sapwood treats better than heartwood and that fluids move much faster in the longitudinal than in the transverse direction. Associated with these phenomena is the permeability of wood. The literature (Tesoro et al. 1966, Arganbright and Wilcox 1969, Erickson and Estep 1962, Siau 1970, Choong et al. 1972) revealed contradictory results on this property with treatability, although these studies predominantly indicate that highly permeable wood treats better than those woods of low permeability/ This paper reports on the relationship between various permeability and treatability values among different groups of wood species and wood types. Experimental Materials and Preparation Twelve species were selected for study. These included nine hardwoods and three softwoods. Of the hardwoods, four were ring porous: black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), American elm (Ulmus americana L.), white oak (Quercus spp.), and hackberry (Celtis occidentalis L.); three were diffuse porous: sycampre (Platanus occidentalis L.), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and soft maple (Acer spp.); and two were semiring porous: black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) and cotton12* Florentino O. Tesoro and Elvin

Journal

Holzforschung - International Journal of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Technology of Woodde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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