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Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market for Recent College Graduates: Evidence from a Field Experiment

Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market for Recent College Graduates: Evidence from a Field... Abstract We present experimental evidence from a correspondence test of racial discrimination in the labor market for recent college graduates. We find strong evidence of differential treatment by race: black applicants receive approximately 14% fewer interview requests than their otherwise identical white counterparts. The racial gap in employment opportunities is larger when comparisons are made between job seekers with credentials that proxy for expected productivity and/or match quality. Moreover, the racial discrimination detected is driven by greater discrimination in jobs that require customer interaction. Various tests for the type of discrimination tend to support taste-based discrimination, but we are unable to rule out risk aversion on the part of employers as a possible explanation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy de Gruyter

Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market for Recent College Graduates: Evidence from a Field Experiment

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
2194-6108
eISSN
1935-1682
DOI
10.1515/bejeap-2014-0082
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We present experimental evidence from a correspondence test of racial discrimination in the labor market for recent college graduates. We find strong evidence of differential treatment by race: black applicants receive approximately 14% fewer interview requests than their otherwise identical white counterparts. The racial gap in employment opportunities is larger when comparisons are made between job seekers with credentials that proxy for expected productivity and/or match quality. Moreover, the racial discrimination detected is driven by greater discrimination in jobs that require customer interaction. Various tests for the type of discrimination tend to support taste-based discrimination, but we are unable to rule out risk aversion on the part of employers as a possible explanation.

Journal

The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policyde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2015

References