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Process intensification for sustainable energy conversion

Process intensification for sustainable energy conversion Green Process Synth 2015; 4: 451 Book review DOI 10.1515/gps-2015-0079 Fausto Gallucci and Martin van Sint Annaland (Eds.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2015 Hardcover, 408 pp. Print ISBN: 978-1-118-44935-6 Online ISBN: 978-1-118-44939-4 Process intensification for sustainable energy conversion, by Fausto Gallucci and Martin van Sint Annaland, is a comprehensive text that contributes to close the gap between process intensification concepts and sustainable energy technologies. The book is divided into 11 chapters, in which the authors address topics such as: carbon capture, fuel conversion, fuel cells, conversion of biomass, bioenergy, solar processes and blue energy. Chapter 1 is devoted to the introduction. Here, the reader can understand the importance of the topics discussed on the book and its organization. A novel cryogenic carbon capture process is presented in chapter 2. The authors provide a description of the process, simulation results, economic data evaluation and description of proof of concept at the laboratory and pilot scale. In chapter 3 the authors discuss carbon capture via the pre-combustion decarbonization process using membrane reactors (MR). This process allows simultaneous productions of H2 with CO2 capture in a single unit. Three types of MRs are described: packed bed, fluidized bed and micro-membrane reactors. Then in chapter 4 the authors address the oxyfuel combustion process using O2 permeation membranes, which provides the O2 needed by the reaction. In a similar topic, chapter 5 deals with chemical looping combustion (CLC). In this case O2 is provided to the reaction via an oxygen carrier (OC) that transports it from an air reactor, where the OC is regenerated, to a fuel reactor, where the combustion occurs. In chapter 6 the use of sorbents to improve fuel conversion is discussed. Two sorption-enhanced reactions are addressed: steam methane reforming and water gas shift reaction. The authors describe processes, sorbents and application of these novel technologies in power plants with CO2 capture. In chapter 7 the authors address the production of H2 for fuel cell application by means of Pd-based membranes. Several raw materials are analyzed, as well as the use of microstructure membrane reactors and integration of fuel cells with Pd-based membranes. Then, in chapters 8 and 11 the authors focus on biomass conversion. Description of projects and facilities available in Europe are given, together with an explanation of main process steps: (i) gasification; (ii) gas cleaning (detailed in chapter 11); and (iii) synthetic natural gas production (only, chapter 8). In chapter 9 the authors address energy production by means of salinity gradients. Several processes are discussed and emphasis is put on pressure retarded osmosis technology. In chapter 10 the authors discuss the use of solar energy as a source of heat for industry. Descriptions of potential uses, bottlenecks and use of process intensification to increase the benefits of solar energy are addressed. In conclusion, this book is a great piece of technical literature. The topics discussed throughout the 11 chapters are well interconnected and this can be easily observed as the reader moves from one chapter to the other. This generates a feeling of coherence, that added to a clear structure and writing style, facilitates the reading and makes it a pleasant experience. The use of figures to present examples and tables to summarize data is extensive, which contributes to an easy understanding of the concepts explained. Of distinctive value is the inclusion of figures with thorough process descriptions, because not only a specific concept can be visualized, but also how this concept integrates on a real-scale process can be understood. Also, a great deal of recent literature is cited throughout the book, which allows the reader to deepen their knowledge in any particular topic. Finally, this book is valuable reference material for postgraduate students, researchers and professionals working with novel technologies for sustainable energy conversion. Carlos Ortega Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Eindhoven University of Technology De Rondom 70 5612 AP Eindhoven, The Netherlands E-mail: c.e.ortega@tue.nl http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Green Processing and Synthesis de Gruyter

Process intensification for sustainable energy conversion

Green Processing and Synthesis , Volume 4 (5) – Oct 1, 2015

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
2191-9542
eISSN
2191-9550
DOI
10.1515/gps-2015-0079
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Abstract

Green Process Synth 2015; 4: 451 Book review DOI 10.1515/gps-2015-0079 Fausto Gallucci and Martin van Sint Annaland (Eds.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2015 Hardcover, 408 pp. Print ISBN: 978-1-118-44935-6 Online ISBN: 978-1-118-44939-4 Process intensification for sustainable energy conversion, by Fausto Gallucci and Martin van Sint Annaland, is a comprehensive text that contributes to close the gap between process intensification concepts and sustainable energy technologies. The book is divided into 11 chapters, in which the authors address topics such as: carbon capture, fuel conversion, fuel cells, conversion of biomass, bioenergy, solar processes and blue energy. Chapter 1 is devoted to the introduction. Here, the reader can understand the importance of the topics discussed on the book and its organization. A novel cryogenic carbon capture process is presented in chapter 2. The authors provide a description of the process, simulation results, economic data evaluation and description of proof of concept at the laboratory and pilot scale. In chapter 3 the authors discuss carbon capture via the pre-combustion decarbonization process using membrane reactors (MR). This process allows simultaneous productions of H2 with CO2 capture in a single unit. Three types of MRs are described: packed bed, fluidized bed and micro-membrane reactors. Then in chapter 4 the authors address the oxyfuel combustion process using O2 permeation membranes, which provides the O2 needed by the reaction. In a similar topic, chapter 5 deals with chemical looping combustion (CLC). In this case O2 is provided to the reaction via an oxygen carrier (OC) that transports it from an air reactor, where the OC is regenerated, to a fuel reactor, where the combustion occurs. In chapter 6 the use of sorbents to improve fuel conversion is discussed. Two sorption-enhanced reactions are addressed: steam methane reforming and water gas shift reaction. The authors describe processes, sorbents and application of these novel technologies in power plants with CO2 capture. In chapter 7 the authors address the production of H2 for fuel cell application by means of Pd-based membranes. Several raw materials are analyzed, as well as the use of microstructure membrane reactors and integration of fuel cells with Pd-based membranes. Then, in chapters 8 and 11 the authors focus on biomass conversion. Description of projects and facilities available in Europe are given, together with an explanation of main process steps: (i) gasification; (ii) gas cleaning (detailed in chapter 11); and (iii) synthetic natural gas production (only, chapter 8). In chapter 9 the authors address energy production by means of salinity gradients. Several processes are discussed and emphasis is put on pressure retarded osmosis technology. In chapter 10 the authors discuss the use of solar energy as a source of heat for industry. Descriptions of potential uses, bottlenecks and use of process intensification to increase the benefits of solar energy are addressed. In conclusion, this book is a great piece of technical literature. The topics discussed throughout the 11 chapters are well interconnected and this can be easily observed as the reader moves from one chapter to the other. This generates a feeling of coherence, that added to a clear structure and writing style, facilitates the reading and makes it a pleasant experience. The use of figures to present examples and tables to summarize data is extensive, which contributes to an easy understanding of the concepts explained. Of distinctive value is the inclusion of figures with thorough process descriptions, because not only a specific concept can be visualized, but also how this concept integrates on a real-scale process can be understood. Also, a great deal of recent literature is cited throughout the book, which allows the reader to deepen their knowledge in any particular topic. Finally, this book is valuable reference material for postgraduate students, researchers and professionals working with novel technologies for sustainable energy conversion. Carlos Ortega Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Eindhoven University of Technology De Rondom 70 5612 AP Eindhoven, The Netherlands E-mail: c.e.ortega@tue.nl

Journal

Green Processing and Synthesisde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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