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Preparing the milk and honey: between ethnography and academia as a racially minoritised academic

Preparing the milk and honey: between ethnography and academia as a racially minoritised academic AbstractThis paper focuses on the development of an academic of colour between ethnographic fieldwork and becoming an academic. In terms of data collection, this study demonstrates the complexities and multiple positionalities ascribed and assumed within fieldwork which question the stability of the insider/outsider dichotomy. These positionalities range from being a Muslim ‘brother’ to being aligned with Government security. Being Muslim and male also allowed for entrance in areas of the field which were exclusively for Muslim males. While fieldwork presented certain complexities, being a person of colour and Muslim in academia presents many more. A number of studies have demonstrated the structural whiteness of academia and thus, dealing with this as an academic of colour require particular skills and actions. I share my experiences of navigating academia as a person of colour and question the role of whiteness within ethnographically oriented representative groups which are exclusively white and who represent an academic audience for ethnographic scholarship. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Linguistics Review de Gruyter

Preparing the milk and honey: between ethnography and academia as a racially minoritised academic

Applied Linguistics Review , Volume 11 (2): 25 – May 26, 2020

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2020 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1868-6303
eISSN
1868-6311
DOI
10.1515/applirev-2017-0120
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper focuses on the development of an academic of colour between ethnographic fieldwork and becoming an academic. In terms of data collection, this study demonstrates the complexities and multiple positionalities ascribed and assumed within fieldwork which question the stability of the insider/outsider dichotomy. These positionalities range from being a Muslim ‘brother’ to being aligned with Government security. Being Muslim and male also allowed for entrance in areas of the field which were exclusively for Muslim males. While fieldwork presented certain complexities, being a person of colour and Muslim in academia presents many more. A number of studies have demonstrated the structural whiteness of academia and thus, dealing with this as an academic of colour require particular skills and actions. I share my experiences of navigating academia as a person of colour and question the role of whiteness within ethnographically oriented representative groups which are exclusively white and who represent an academic audience for ethnographic scholarship.

Journal

Applied Linguistics Reviewde Gruyter

Published: May 26, 2020

Keywords: ethnography; racism; diversity; whiteness; positionality

References