Predictive aspects of nonverbal courtship behavior in women

Predictive aspects of nonverbal courtship behavior in women Introduction Courtship behavior can be divided into two phases: the attraction stage and the selection stage. Both stages have been well documented in a wide variety of species (Burton 1953, Bastock 1967, Crook 1972). Only recently, however, have ethologists begun to describe courtship behavior in humans (Birdwhistell 1970, Morris 1971, Kendon 1975, Lockard and Adams 1980). But because many observational studies have focused on courting couples, knowledge regarding human courtship is biased toward the later stages of a heterosexual relationship. Interview and questionnaire data (Baber 1939, Coombs and Kenkel 1966, Tavris 1977) also present information about selection rather than attraction. While some information about attraction is available from social psychologists, much of the relevant data result from experimentally manipulated meetings between undergraduates. In this fashion, attraction has been ascribed to a multitude of factors, including similarity in attitudes (Byrne 1971), reciprocity (Altman and Taylor 1973, Huesmann and Levinger 1976), and physical attractiveness (Walster et al. 1966). But there is a lack of data regarding attraction which is compiled primarily through naturalistic observation of early encounters in the courtship sequence, despite the fact that the initial stage of attraction appears to be uniquely suited to observational techniques. Field studies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique de Gruyter

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/predictive-aspects-of-nonverbal-courtship-behavior-in-women-hNFPar7ZCg
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0037-1998
eISSN
1613-3692
DOI
10.1515/semi.1989.76.3-4.205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Courtship behavior can be divided into two phases: the attraction stage and the selection stage. Both stages have been well documented in a wide variety of species (Burton 1953, Bastock 1967, Crook 1972). Only recently, however, have ethologists begun to describe courtship behavior in humans (Birdwhistell 1970, Morris 1971, Kendon 1975, Lockard and Adams 1980). But because many observational studies have focused on courting couples, knowledge regarding human courtship is biased toward the later stages of a heterosexual relationship. Interview and questionnaire data (Baber 1939, Coombs and Kenkel 1966, Tavris 1977) also present information about selection rather than attraction. While some information about attraction is available from social psychologists, much of the relevant data result from experimentally manipulated meetings between undergraduates. In this fashion, attraction has been ascribed to a multitude of factors, including similarity in attitudes (Byrne 1971), reciprocity (Altman and Taylor 1973, Huesmann and Levinger 1976), and physical attractiveness (Walster et al. 1966). But there is a lack of data regarding attraction which is compiled primarily through naturalistic observation of early encounters in the courtship sequence, despite the fact that the initial stage of attraction appears to be uniquely suited to observational techniques. Field studies

Journal

Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotiquede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1989

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off