PHYSICAL VERSUS SEMANTIC CLASSIFICATION OF NONVERBAL FORMS: A CROSS-CULTURAL EXPERIMENT

PHYSICAL VERSUS SEMANTIC CLASSIFICATION OF NONVERBAL FORMS: A CROSS-CULTURAL EXPERIMENT INTRODUCTION Judged similarity tests have been used with increasing frequency to study the cognitive organization of verbal materials. In this .paper we extend the existing methodology to a new domain. Here we investigate judged similarities among nonverbal acts. One simple question motivating the research is whether or not the judged similarity test (in this case the triads test) can elicit nonrandom judgments of similarity among the elements of nonverbal behavior. A second question motivating the work is whether people will classify nonverbal acts on the basis of anatomy and motion or on the basis of semantics. The elements of nonverbal behavior considered in this paper will be called emblems. Ekman and Friesen (1972) define emblems as: those nonverbal acts (a) which have a direct verbal translation usually consisting of a word of two, or a phrase, (b) for which this precise meaning is known by most or all members of a group, class, subculture, or culture, (c) which are most often deliberately used with the conscious intent to send a particular message to the other person(s), (d) for which the person(s) who sees the emblem usually not only knows tne emblem's message but also knows that it was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0037-1998
eISSN
1613-3692
DOI
10.1515/semi.1976.17.4.315
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Judged similarity tests have been used with increasing frequency to study the cognitive organization of verbal materials. In this .paper we extend the existing methodology to a new domain. Here we investigate judged similarities among nonverbal acts. One simple question motivating the research is whether or not the judged similarity test (in this case the triads test) can elicit nonrandom judgments of similarity among the elements of nonverbal behavior. A second question motivating the work is whether people will classify nonverbal acts on the basis of anatomy and motion or on the basis of semantics. The elements of nonverbal behavior considered in this paper will be called emblems. Ekman and Friesen (1972) define emblems as: those nonverbal acts (a) which have a direct verbal translation usually consisting of a word of two, or a phrase, (b) for which this precise meaning is known by most or all members of a group, class, subculture, or culture, (c) which are most often deliberately used with the conscious intent to send a particular message to the other person(s), (d) for which the person(s) who sees the emblem usually not only knows tne emblem's message but also knows that it was

Journal

Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotiquede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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