Pediatric Endocrine Diseases in Pre-Hispanic Aztecs

Pediatric Endocrine Diseases in Pre-Hispanic Aztecs Mexico HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Aztec medical and religious knowledge derived from Olmecs (800 BC), Teotihuacans (100 BC) and Toltecs (1100-1521 AC); however, there is no unique source that accurately presents Aztec medicine. Sahagun combines naturalism and religion but not magic (\"First Memorials\", \"Matritense Codex\", \"Florentine Codex\" and \"General History of New Spain\"); Hernandez gives a naturalistic image but is full of mistakes (\"Natural History of the New Spain\"); Badiano tries to match Aztecs with contemporary Europeans and with the first century medicine of the Romans (\"Badiano Codex\"), and Ruiz de Alarcon contains plenty of magical concepts (\"Book of Superstition\"). For the Aztecs, surveillance of growth was very important and represented a balance between body and soul. They described the different steps of pubertal development. They had specific treatments for thyroid disease in children, mainly hypothyroidism and goiter. There are no references to rickets, nor to type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus. When the Spaniards arrived in Mexico in 1519, the dominant culture was the Aztec or Mexica's Emporium, which represented the syncretism of the civilizations that had developed in the previous 2000 years in Meso-America: in the central zone of Mexico and Honduras, mainly Olmecs (800 BC), Teotihuacans (100 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism de Gruyter

Pediatric Endocrine Diseases in Pre-Hispanic Aztecs

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/pediatric-endocrine-diseases-in-pre-hispanic-aztecs-s27kkebHoN
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by the
ISSN
0334-018X
eISSN
2191-0251
DOI
10.1515/JPEM.2003.16.4.487
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mexico HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Aztec medical and religious knowledge derived from Olmecs (800 BC), Teotihuacans (100 BC) and Toltecs (1100-1521 AC); however, there is no unique source that accurately presents Aztec medicine. Sahagun combines naturalism and religion but not magic (\"First Memorials\", \"Matritense Codex\", \"Florentine Codex\" and \"General History of New Spain\"); Hernandez gives a naturalistic image but is full of mistakes (\"Natural History of the New Spain\"); Badiano tries to match Aztecs with contemporary Europeans and with the first century medicine of the Romans (\"Badiano Codex\"), and Ruiz de Alarcon contains plenty of magical concepts (\"Book of Superstition\"). For the Aztecs, surveillance of growth was very important and represented a balance between body and soul. They described the different steps of pubertal development. They had specific treatments for thyroid disease in children, mainly hypothyroidism and goiter. There are no references to rickets, nor to type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus. When the Spaniards arrived in Mexico in 1519, the dominant culture was the Aztec or Mexica's Emporium, which represented the syncretism of the civilizations that had developed in the previous 2000 years in Meso-America: in the central zone of Mexico and Honduras, mainly Olmecs (800 BC), Teotihuacans (100

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off